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Author Topic: What should I do?  (Read 280 times)

hutch`980

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What should I do?
« on: October 09, 2013, 02:34:17 PM »
I am 33 and I actually matriculated into a Law School in Calfornia in 2009. I left after the first semester due a major loss in the family. I am currently a Registered Investment Advisor with a Series 7,63 and 65 licenses. I have read the writing on the wall and my career in this industry will come to an end. I have been thinking about going back to law School. I have an LSAT and GPA to probably get accepted into the school I would want to attend. Its either Law School or get into the family business which is Real Estate. I haven't really researched much lately about employment statistics regarding to being an Attorney. Should I even consider going back to law school? Its either going to school for the next 3 years with more education debt and just starting as a newly minted Attorney at 37 or have 3 years under my belt as a Realtor. I am interested in hearing both sides. I am looking for longevity and obviously the opportunity to actually get ahead.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Citylaw

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Re: What should I do?
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2013, 02:03:40 AM »
The bottom line is no career is guaranteed as you are seeing in your current situation.

Also do not read into statistics to much they can be manipulated tremendously. I graduated last year from a not top 10 law school and found a job as an attorney that I truly enjoy and basically every normal person from my school got a job. If you attend law school, pass the bar, and behave like a normal person you can find employment, but you are unlikely to start out with a high salary, but the more years of experience you have the more valuable you become.

You should be wary of costs, because as a slightly older person you do have less time to recoup your investment, but you will be 37 when you graduate and pass the bar, which will leave you with a solid 30+ years to practice law.

Something to note is that many schools offer scholarships or in-state tuition and getting out with less debt is the way to go.

It also likes you must have some interest in law school if you already attended and want to come back. I say go for it, but consider cost and location in your decision. Good luck!