LSAT Preparation > Studying for the LSAT

Time to allot for studying

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xander787:
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Miami88:
I'd say you take the test whenever you feel most prepared - no sooner. That will probably be, in terms of practice time, very different for each person. I'm not sure where lawschooli.com got their info from, but there are plenty of people - myself included - who have continued to score higher, more consistently with more time. I actually read somewhere that some LSAC rep said he recommends at least 6 months of study.

I spent about 2 months drilling technique/method until I was consistently scoring 180s on un-timed tests. I did not plan that, it just so happened to take me that long to get there. I then took 2-3 months to transition into timed tests and then another 2 months to transition to exact test conditions. By test day, I had taken just about every single test available and did not run out of tests. Remember, you MUST review every single test - in some cases multiple times.

I ended up scoring within my average LSAT PT band - albeit in the lower end of it.

Good luck!

Citylaw:
If I am reading your post correctly then you are a Freshman at UCLA. If that is the case do not worry about the LSAT until your junior or senior year of college for several reasons (1) You need to focus on getting a solid GPA (2) Have fun in College (3) Your LSAT score will expire by the time you can even apply and (4) by the time your a junior or senior in college you may have no desire to attend law school. (5) The LSAT is not going anywhere don't rush into it best time to take it assuming you even still want to attend law school is the summer of your Junior Year.

Overall right now don't worry about your LSAT it is to early in the game and you can score a 180 on your LSAT, but if you neglect your undergrad studies and finish with a 2.1 GPA your SOL. Additionally, you can retake the LSAT, but you cannot change your undergrad GPA so focus on getting the best grades you can now and worry about the LSAT later it is not going anywhere.

Your enthusiasm is great, but if your only a freshman college it is misplaced and you need to focus on what you are doing now particularly if this is your first month or so in college many students have a poor first year in college, which later impacts their grad school opportunities don't let them happen to you because you were to busy studying for the LSAT.

Good luck with everything and if law school ends up being what you want in a few years I wish you the best.

mrshello:

--- Quote from: Miami88 on September 08, 2013, 08:21:35 AM ---I'd say you take the test whenever you feel most prepared - no sooner. That will probably be, in terms of practice time, very different for each person. I'm not sure where lawschooli.com got their info from, but there are plenty of people - myself included - who have continued to score higher, more consistently with more time. I actually read somewhere that some LSAC rep said he recommends at least 6 months of study.

I spent about 2 months drilling technique/method until I was consistently scoring 180s on un-timed tests. I did not plan that, it just so happened to take me that long to get there. I then took 2-3 months to transition into timed tests and then another 2 months to transition to exact test conditions. By test day, I had taken just about every single test available and did not run out of tests. Remember, you MUST review every single test - in some cases multiple times.

I ended up scoring within my average LSAT PT band - albeit in the lower end of it.

Good luck!

--- End quote ---

I intend to work on LSAT-related materials everyday. 2 fully timed test every week. Working with specific sections and where I went wrong on other days. Also, working with BenchPrep online LSAT prep program. In essence, I intend to work on the LSAT an hour or an hour and half on "light" days and full tests and two hours additional review on "weekends." I'm working to break into 170 this December  (UPDATE: I initially said I was gonna take it this October) and my diagnostic (under real time and conditions) is 147. 

Miami88:
Going from 147 to over 170 is ambitious to say the least. I'm not saying its impossible - but you may find a month to be a little bit of a time crunch. If you truly think you can do it - id consider post-poning the test until February, or even June. If you don't think that is realistic, then take the test when you feel completely ready...

Good luck!

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