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Author Topic: Academic Misconduct Affect on Admissions  (Read 1424 times)

Parapraxis

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Academic Misconduct Affect on Admissions
« on: July 15, 2013, 11:59:27 PM »
I plead guilty to violating my school's academic integrity policy my first semester freshman year and was placed on probation for the remainder of the semester. In short, I and another student were accused of collaboration/plagiarism in a writing seminar class after being placed in the same peer review group and I agreed to take the blame. I can't stress enough how ignorant I was of the offense until my accusation; our essays had similar theses and I was unaware of the extent of similarity of our final submissions.
There seems to be little discussion available on the impact of unintentional academic dishonesty in the admissions process at t14-30 schools and I find myself questioning my decision to even pursue law school if my cycle will be unpredictable because of this incident.
3.65/170

EDIT: Also have a marijuana charge on my record Sophomore year, but that seems trivial.

IrrX

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Re: Academic Misconduct Affect on Admissions
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2013, 11:59:16 PM »
Don't sweat it. People screw up sometimes, and people have gotten in with far worse. If it's something you need to explain, or have worked to resolve--like a drug treatment program--just write an addendum explaining what you did to fix it, and how it's made you a better person. But again: don't sweat it.
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livinglegend

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Re: Academic Misconduct Affect on Admissions
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2013, 11:01:24 AM »
Agree with Irrx there were people in my law school that got DUI's and were admitted to law school and passed there moral character exam and others who had arrests. The only way you can really screw it up is by not disclosing these things. By honest forthcoming and apologetic it shouldn't be a problem, but one thing you should NOT DO is fail to disclose this in your law school application.  The one thing that will hurt you is lying that is something every State Bar Association will take seriously.

These events certainly won't help you, but they won't hurt you that much if your forthcoming and honest about these violations.