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Author Topic: Current ABA Response to Distance Education  (Read 2871 times)

haus

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2013, 02:31:54 AM »
I suspect that the first real movements to a ABA approved distance learning JD will end up coming as a program expansion from some already ABA approved school.

Many of these schools have already established online course and sometimes even degrees for other programs. Converting these tools to classes for a JD program will not require a great deal of effort.

jonlevy

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2013, 11:02:22 PM »
Some law school professors get to be members of the bar w/out actually taking the bar depending on state law.

But to teach law why would one need to pass a bar? Some law professors have minimal actual practice experience.  First Year legal writing is almost always taught by a third year student at many schools.


jonlevy

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2013, 11:04:53 PM »
A certain Mr. Obama was a law professor with little or no actual experience practicing law though I am sure his former students are pleased with the outcome as it makes a nice story.

passaroa25

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2013, 12:27:00 AM »
I was at Mercer University School of Law for a year.  All of my professors were attorneys.  I was there for only a year because I signed an agreement to maintain an A average in order to keep a full scholarship.  If only I had known that maintaining an A average in social work school is not the same as maintaining an A average in law school.  (I have an MSW.)
Angie

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2013, 10:21:12 PM »
If only I had known that maintaining an A average in social work school is not the same as maintaining an A average in law school.  (I have an MSW.)

Many of my law school classmates had M.A./M.S./MBA degrees. They pretty much all agreed that master's level grad school was a joke compared to law school. Master's programs can be academically rigorous, but they aren't competitive like law school.

BTW, an A average? That's harsh. I assume you must have had good numbers to get scholarship to Mercer. Is it possible to use those numbers to get a large scholarship at one of the newer law schools in the area? Someplace like Elon or Charleston? 

passaroa25

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Re: Current ABA Response to Distance Education
« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2013, 11:54:51 PM »
Other graduate school programs are vigorous. None of them are a joke.   The problem with law school (that I know now) is that the student is actually learning a new language and a different way of thinking.  Other graduate school programs build on knowledge that the student has already acquired in his/her undergraduate years.  There is no bachelors' degree program with a major in law.  The student would have had to attend the pre-law seminars that (are now) readily available to introduce him/her to how to think like a lawyer.

That scholarship was specifically to attend the Walter F. George (Mercer) University School of Law.  I was accepted to a law school a few years ago.  But, I had given up on law and attended other schools after I left Macon, GA.  So, by the time I mustered up the courage to try law school again, I had already "worn out my welcome" with the federal loan program.  I reached the maximum amount I was able to borrow to attend any school again. 
Angie