Deciding Where to Go > Where should I go next fall?

JD or DBA or both?

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lawyurd:
I am torn between a JD or pursuing a Doctoral of Business.  I would love to do both, not at the same time (that's just crazy!).  Both degrees take a minimum of three years, most likely longer for me since I still have to work and can do a JD part-time or write a dissertation that takes some people years to finish. 

The DBA program I am looking at has a focus on Supply Chain and Logistics.  This is ideal for me and the easy choice since I work in logistics for the federal government.

A JD could be beneficial because I don't want to do logistics forever and would love to move over to the contract side of what we do because of all the stuff I see that could be fixed if someone knew both sides of how things work, (maybe I'm just a naive idealist in this aspect).

I would love to do both programs since I truly believe that I could make an impact knowing both sides of the business.  I can only do the DBA online because the program is not offered anywhere near me here in Florida.  There is at least Florida Coastal School of Law here, a T4 ABA juggernaut.  I'm prepping for the LSAT in June. 

I know that I probably answered my own question about which program to do first but would still love to hear the pros/cons of doing both degrees over time. 

jack24:
You've left out one key piece of information:  What do you want to do for a living?  Do you want to continue working for the feds in logistics?

Law School, particularly after the first year, ads little to no value other than giving you the ability to get a law license.  Sure, law school can teach you to "think like a lawyer," but I'm sure you can learn contract law on your own, especially if you are smart enough to excel in logistics at the Ph.D. level.

There is a difference between needing a law degree and wanting to know things about law. 

 

IrrX:
If you must do one, do the DBA. Based on what you wrote here about your career, you don't even need to go to law school. You certainly won't need a JD. If you want to learn about areas of law that affect your career in logistics, you can go to law school for a limited time, learning only the things that apply to what you do and what you want to know. These programs are generally called a Master of Legal Studies or Master of Studies in Law.

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