LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) > Studying for the LSAT

Is LSAT prep course worth it?

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CA Law Dean:
SJ, I agree that just throwing money at a problem will not necessarily get a better result. From your student viewpoint, I also understand and appreciate the perception that it is never good to spend money unless there is an urgent or immediate need. What I suggest is that the profile presented . . . non-traditional working student with family, 2.29 UGPA, and 145 pre-test . . . sets off potential academic red flags across the board. A comprehensive LSAT prep course, regardless of price, is one early indicator of law school readiness. Before he spends tens of thousands of dollars (and hundreds of hours) on law school . . . the financial commitment to a prep-course, study time, practice exams, and then performance in a group timed exam environment . . . these are each equally as important as the numerical test score in helping a non-traditional student determine whether they are ready, willing, and able to take on the rigors of law school. In other words, it is more complicated than just getting the minimum test score necessary to get admitted to law school . . . it is about testing your readiness and commitment to a really long, demanding educational learning process.

FZacharyJ:
Look what it comes down to is the type of person that you are when it comes to studying. If you need someone on top of you, then maybe the course is worth it, but if you're an independent person who can sit down and get work done, then the courses are a complete waste of money in my opinion. There are so many alternatives to dishing out over $1000 for a course. Self studying is one option which will cost you for the books and such. Another option that i am more fond of is using your ipad or iphone to study. There is an app called LSATMax that is in essence the same exact course you would take in a class but the difference is its only like $300 and you have access to it forever. They have video lectures and homework and actual questions from previous lsats which is great. So if you're looking to save some money and do well maybe the self study route is for you. I met a campus rep from LSATMax at my school and I got his email if you want to ask him about any promotions that they have for students/veterans. I'm pretty sure they have a free trial also. Anyway hope this helps out! the guys email was "farbod@lsatmax.com"

LSAT Blog:

--- Quote from: FZacharyJ on April 30, 2013, 03:06:50 PM ---Look what it comes down to is the type of person that you are when it comes to studying. If you need someone on top of you, then maybe the course is worth it, but if you're an independent person who can sit down and get work done, then the courses are a complete waste of money in my opinion. There are so many alternatives to dishing out over $1000 for a course. Self studying is one option which will cost you for the books and such. Another option that i am more fond of is using your ipad or iphone to study.
--- End quote ---

Since the LSAT is a paper and pencil exam, it's extremely important to complete full-length (5-section) timed exams using physical copies (or at least, print-outs) of the exams, rather than completing them online.

An online video course can be a good alternative to more expensive in-person prep courses, but just be sure to complete the exams on paper.

FZacharyJ:
I couldn't agree more. Thats why the app is so great. When you purchase it, they send you a welcome packet and everything on the app is available to print. They also have all of their lessons and homeworks in organized binders. Its really beneficial considering the fact that all of their practice exams are the actual previous LSATs.

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