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NWCU by the numbers

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calvinexpress:

--- Quote from: law_dog on March 27, 2013, 01:10:30 PM ---You're asking me if I can read?

--- End quote ---

No, he asked you where you got your statistics from. He didn't ask you if you can read.
It looks like your NWCU law school is not training you very well. A good law school would train their law students to never quote statistics without a citation. You never provided a citation because you either made it up, or you foolishly repeated what somebody else told you without verifying the information.

Duncanjp:
I don't have time to confirm the statistics that anonymous internet posters assert in threads such as this, even when properly cited. But assuming the numbers are correct, the obvious conclusion is that nobody who is serious about becoming an attorney enrolls in such an institution. A law degree, even from an ABA school, doesn't really have that much value if you don't pass the bar. It's like having a plumber's license when you work in insurance. And prospective employers in non-legal fields may see you as potential trouble for their HR departments. To be a good fit for an unaccredited, online approach to law school, you really have to want to know the law strictly for the sake of knowing a little about the law, with no expectation of its having any practical application. Example: a minimum security inmate with regular online access might be a good candidate, if the school would admit him. (And why not? He's got nothing but time and it's not like they're serious about producing attorneys.) Another might be a retired senior with loads of free time and curiosity, whose doctor has instructed him to start exercising his mind before he loses it. But that's a gamble, seniors who read this. The cure may become the cause.

jonlevy:

--- Quote from: Duncanjp on March 31, 2013, 02:02:20 PM --- Example: a minimum security inmate with regular online access might be a good candidate, if the school would admit him. (And why not? He's got nothing but time and it's not like they're serious about producing attorneys.) Another might be a retired senior with loads of free time and curiosity, whose doctor has instructed him to start exercising his mind before he loses it. But that's a gamble, seniors who read this. The cure may become the cause.

--- End quote ---

The majority of online students for various reasons cannot attend a regular law school, by default many of them will be unqualified to pass the bar becuase they lacks skills, time, money, or stability.  The odds of getting all the way through and passing are somewhere around 20-1 against given a high attrition rate for various reasons usually failure of the FYLSE or lack of time.  However, law is well suited to online study, it's just that about 95% of the students going the online route are unsuitable.  If the ABA would accredit online study, we would see the attrition go to something like even (50-50) odds of passing the bar.  There is nothing unique about study of law that makes it unsuitable for online study, English and South African law schools have been offering law degrees for years which qualify the graduates for a training contract.

Duncanjp:
I agree with you that the mere activity of learning the law is well-suited to online study, Jon. But becoming a successful attorney involves more than just rote memorization of esoteric rules and learning to perform legal analysis. What do online programs substitute for the face-to-face relationships you form in brick and mortar law schools? I don't believe that the importance of forging relationships and making friends with your classmates can be overstated. (It would take some effort.) Seeing the same people in classes month after month and year after year cements those relationships. I usually prepare for my exams by sitting alone in my den with the door shut, laboring over practice exams and outlines. But the rest of the time, it seems like a mistake to brush off the all-important element of networking if your goal is to succeed in the legal field.

jonlevy:
One can do all the networking necessary after passing the bar and hanging out at the county court house and attending specialization seminars, after all an online grad is likely going to be working as a solo practitioner or they are operating under some delusion they are a desirable job candidate. 

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