Specific Groups / Issues > Non-Traditional Students

Looking for some advice....

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Groundhog:

--- Quote from: jack24 on January 07, 2013, 02:34:30 PM ---To be honest, if your only real goal was to get into law school, I would advise you find a decent 4 year college and get the easiest (and cheapest) degree you can find while studying for the LSAT.   A 3.8 GPA and 160 LSAT out of a no-name 4 year college is much better than a 3.4 GPA and 160 LSAT out of a good state school.

--- End quote ---
This.

Maintain FL 350:
If the OP is located in California he may want to consider the CBE (California bar) accredited law schools. Of course, there are many factors that should be considered when contemplating a non-ABA school, but in the OP's case it might be a viable option.

CBE schools don't necessarily require a bachelor's degree for admission, I think two years of college work will suffice. This could save the OP a couple of years worth of tuition and time. They also tend to be cheaper than ABA schools and offer part-time programs.

The main factors to consider are the OP's post-law school plans. If he wants to work at a large firm or government office, then an ABA degree is a must. Also, many states will not accept a non-ABA degrees for bar admission. Considering the other factors the OP has listed, however, this may be a route to consider. 

jonlevy:
I'd question whether anyone with just two years of undergrad work could pass the cal bar unless they were a genius.  Your typical community college grad is going to have trouble stringing together enough coherent words to pass the bar. I am not dissing community college but in many cases it is simply a rehash of High School courses.

Rocketdog2017:

--- Quote from: jonlevy on January 14, 2013, 08:24:00 PM ---I'd question whether anyone with just two years of undergrad work could pass the cal bar unless they were a genius.  Your typical community college grad is going to have trouble stringing together enough coherent words to pass the bar. I am not dissing community college but in many cases it is simply a rehash of High School courses.

--- End quote ---

ANYONE? ... I'd be careful before posting a blanket comment about something like this in a public forum. There are always people who will dazzle your mind. Good Will Hunting movie. Diamonds in the rough exist without being in the spotlight....but they are still there.

my .02

CA Law Dean:
JL, I agree with many of your viewpoints, but sometimes you are stuck in your own limited paradigm. If you see the world solely through the model of a traditional student in their 20s going from high school, to college, to law school . . . you miss the entire point of the non-traditional student. Just three years ago, our number one graduate, moot court finalist, first time bar passer, and now successful local lawyer was a special student who entered without even an AA degree. She qualified through the baby bar and was an exceptional student from day one. Her education was in computer science and she had numerous certificates that qualified her for her job field in programing . . . just not the type of liberal arts education that somehow is presumed to better "qualify" a student in the study of law. She may be an unusual case . . . but we have returning veterans, small business entrepreneurs, and 50+ year old business professionals who did not have the luxury of a full undergraduate education that prove repeatedly that the piece of paper is not as important as an assessment of their interest, dedication, and willingness to do the extra work to make up any possible academic deficiencies.

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