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Author Topic: Best Pre Law Course  (Read 676 times)

greg8

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Best Pre Law Course
« on: November 30, 2012, 04:25:11 AM »
What will be the best pre law courses in college if I'm gonna enter to law school?

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Best Pre Law Course
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 11:17:48 AM »
Honestly, there are very few classes you can take in undergrad that will prepare you for law school. The intensity, methods, and dynamics are on a totally different level. My undergrad offered a few legal history classes, but they were broad survey courses and didn't utilize the case method. I think lots of schools offer a few business law classes, too, but I'm not sure how helpful those are.

That said, I suppose classes like logic and constitutional history would be helpful. Also, anything with a heavy writing focus. I had a friend who was a journalism major and felt that the process of distilling large amounts of info into short articles helped with law school exams.   


Groundhog

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Re: Best Pre Law Course
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2012, 08:56:46 PM »
Take symbolic logic, because it prepares you very well for the LSAT and parsing dense sentences to their meaning.

Other than that, as the above poster said, classes that focus on writing and reading are good. Some undergraduate professors in Political Science and Philosophy use socratic method. Law-related undergraduate classes won't impress anyone but they can give you an idea about the various fields of the law and what it's actually like.

http://www.uic.edu/cba/cba-depts/economics/undergrad/table.htm has a list of average LSAT scores by major. While I'm not suggesting you pick your major based on what gets the highest LSAT scores, you could certainly use it as a good list of classes that require critical thinking. Note that pre-law and criminology majors do the worst, suggesting those classes aren't particularly good at teaching the kind of critical thinking required by the LSAT and law school, if you believe the LSAT is a good indicator of law school success.