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Author Topic: Academically Disqualified 10+ years ago, now wondering how to get back in...  (Read 3160 times)

ChasingPaper

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Thanks, avarist, for the links and information.  My interest is to further my current career so much of the criticisms in the linked information doesn't really apply to my situation but great to know.

I stated that I am getting tired of standardized tests, not that I hate standardized tests.  If I hated them, I wouldn't have all of those letters behind my professional name.  I've found my own economical method for self study that has proven to be effective because I was not impressed with the Kaplan LSAT prep I took almost 20 years ago and steer clear of costly prep courses.  I prefer self study and solo projects, which was quite a challenge in Business School where everything is team oriented.

I have read about the low pass rates on the Baby Bar, and this is concerning for me.  I want to approach a possible return with open eyes and realistic expectations, and I realize that not passing the baby bar is a potential outcome.  Because I am risk adverse, and this venture would be a risk, I'd rather minimize my risk with a $5000 loss instead of a $27000 loss.

It is true that California lacks a low cost ABA school, I wasn't aware that other states had at least one low cost ABA option.  But the low FYLSX pass rate presents tough odds.

Thanks for the tips.  I've enjoyed the feedback that I've received here.  I'm glad I stumbled onto this site. 

avarist

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Glad to be of help.

If you just want it to further your current career and not to practice. There is the EJD Option (can't sit the bar, but no fybx requirment and about 20 less credits required to graduate)

http://info.concordlawschool.edu/Pages/Executive_Juris_Doctor.aspx
(I believe Concord is the only "Regionally Accredited" EJD available)

The Executive JD (EJDsm) is a unique law degree program pioneered by Concord Law School. The Executive Juris Doctor program provides individuals with an interest in the law, or those whose career would benefit from advanced legal knowledge, the opportunity to participate in law school courses without the regulatory hurdles associated with becoming a member of the Bar.

The program attracts a wide range of professionals including business people, health care administrators, and teachers who appreciate the challenging curriculum and interaction found at Concord Law School. Through their studies, they gain a sophisticated knowledge of the law and sharpen their analytical reasoning and communication skills.

The Executive Juris Doctor program is a 72-unit, three-year, part-time program. After the first year, during which the EJD students take the same foundational courses required of the Juris Doctor student, there is a great deal of flexibility in course selection. In the second and third years, EJD students are encouraged to construct a curriculum plan centered on their interests and career needs. Enrollees also have somewhat more flexibility in their pace of study as they are not required to adhere to the strict guidelines of the State Bar of California.


Maintain FL 350

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I have read about the low pass rates on the Baby Bar, and this is concerning for me.

As long as you attend a CBE accredited school, you'll be exempt from the FYLSE (unless you're disqualified and have to seek re-admission, I think).

California has CBE accredited schools, unaccredited registered schools, and unaccredited unregistered schools. If you go to either of the last two types you'll have to take the FYLSE. All online or correspondance schools fall into one of those two categories, and a few brick & mortar schools do too (California Southern Law School in Riverside, for example). Make sure to confirm that the school is accredited by Calbar and not just registered.

If you just want it to further your current career and not to practice. There is the EJD Option (can't sit the bar, but no fybx requirment and about 20 less credits required to graduate)

This is just my opinion, but I think that the potential benefits of an EJD accrue to very, very few people. For the vast majority of students an EJD is waste of time and money.

It doesn't qualify you to take the bar, it's almost as expensive as a bar qualifying JD (non-ABA), and nobody takes it seriously anyway. I'm sure that there is always some benefit to acquiring limited, general legal knowledge, but you'd want to do a serious cost/benefit analysis.

I worked at a large national non-profit organization and in consulting before going to law school. JDs, MBAs, and few other degrees were considered beneficial (and sometimes necessary) for promotion. An EJD, especially from an unaccredited online school, would have been pretty much disregarded. I just don't see the investment paying off for most people.

ChasingPaper

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Thanks Roald & avarist.  I wish this site was in existence in 1998 when all of this happened to me because I had no one to talk to at that time to properly set out my options.  The ability to bounce off ideas and get honest feedback is something I wish I had years ago.

The EJD is really not something I want to pursue because it is a worthless degree in the marketplace (at least in my industry) and it would be a waste of time and money.  Even a non-accredited MBA is worthless, and there are many so-called business programs that are not AASCB accredited.  Many employers do not consider a MBA from these 'schools' as valid, and I know that even a non-ABA, but CBE, JD is pushing the envelope in employer recognition.

If I actually jump through all the hoops and get into this school, I would want the option of taking the bar.  I just need to mentally prepare myself for four years of hell to get there.

Thanks again....

jonlevy

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I agree with Roald, try a Calbar school with no FYLSE. but first I would also talk to admissions at Cooley candidly about the situation.  Why Cooley?  Because it supposedly has about lowest admission standards of any ABA accredited school.  Any ABA accredited degree is always bertter than non ABA and a Cooley degree will let you take an easy bar like Illinois as opposed to the hard one in California.

ChasingPaper

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I agree with Roald, try a Calbar school with no FYLSE. but first I would also talk to admissions at Cooley candidly about the situation.  Why Cooley?  Because it supposedly has about lowest admission standards of any ABA accredited school.  Any ABA accredited degree is always bertter than non ABA and a Cooley degree will let you take an easy bar like Illinois as opposed to the hard one in California.

Thanks, jonlevy.  Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on how you look at it) I'm stuck in California and really cannot move due to family obligations.  If I move anywhere it will be to New Zealand once I retire.  The school I want to attend is a CBE accredited school so I wouldn't have to take the baby bar.

I'm still on the fence about all of it because I know just how much of a commitment it will be, and I'm not sure it is worth it.  Many of my friends from law school wound up in my industry, albeit as counsel and they make about 50% more than I do, and some are not happy with their choices.

I'm not sure if anyone else had this happen to them, but I had a few lawyer-friends try to talk me out of law school before I went in 1997.  I didn't listen to them then and I'm pretty sure the same people will say the same thing now.  I'm pretty sure that they will think I'm crazy to want to go back right now.....which is why I haven't talked to them about this idea yet.