Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Greece takes on the LSAT  (Read 3540 times)

Pumba

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Greece takes on the LSAT
« on: September 19, 2012, 11:23:25 AM »
Hello everyone, I am a 21 year old political science student from Greece ( currently living in Greece as well )and I decided to go for the LSAT. I started studying the Powerscore Logic Games Bible 2 days ago, got to page 49 but I am still making mistakes lol. I think a teacher could explain everything in more detail , but this is impossible here, obviously. I am planning on taking the December LSAT ( I am travelling to Bulgaria for that : O ) what say you , do I stand a chance of getting a decent score ? any tips would be much appreciated. ( I will be studying about 5-6 hours everyday )

Cher1300

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 126
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012, 03:46:22 PM »
Take a timed practice test first from one of the books you can get at just about any book store and see what score you start with.  From there, you'll be able to determine how much more work you'll need to do to increase your score.

Pumba

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2012, 04:21:33 PM »
To be honest I have not already done this since I am pretty sure I will most probably be disappointed , you see even though I have a Proficiency in English Degree from the University of Michigan English is not my mother tongue, so I thought about reading the two bibles I got ( LG RC from Powerscore - if I may , these books are awesome ) and then testing myself. Depending on the results, I can then reread more than once the respective bible(s) along with additional practice and actual tests. BUT since I am actually new here and to the entire LSAT state of mind , if you insist that I should do so, I will take an actual test. Thanks for the feedback

Thane Messinger

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2012, 05:17:54 PM »
To be honest I have not already done this since I am pretty sure I will most probably be disappointed , you see even though I have a Proficiency in English Degree from the University of Michigan English is not my mother tongue, so I thought about reading the two bibles I got ( LG RC from Powerscore - if I may , these books are awesome ) and then testing myself. Depending on the results, I can then reread more than once the respective bible(s) along with additional practice and actual tests. BUT since I am actually new here and to the entire LSAT state of mind , if you insist that I should do so, I will take an actual test. Thanks for the feedback


Pumba -

Your situation, while unique, is not unknown among LSAT-takers.  Indeed, the phrase among many (American) students is that the LSAT is like "reading Greek."  (No insult, as Greek, being along with Latin and German one of the linguistic progenitors of English, is used to indicate something difficult in English to interpret.)

First, a law program in the U.S. is one of nit-picky extraction from passages, cases, and occasionally statutes.  Your background in political science is not unusual, but leads to a basic question:  Why do you want to study law?  This is important as the training and practice are both technical.  This is only somewhat different at the tippy-top (Top 5-10) law schools in the U.S.  So, if you love big-picture policy questions, you might find a happier home in a Ph.D. program in political science.  (But careers in political science are quite limited, and as a rule require the Ph.D.)

The LSAT is a good test, and preparations for it should be extensive.  "Extensive" is measured in dozens of practice exams, and hundreds of exercises.  What you'll find after this is one of two things (not mutually exclusive):  (1) you get much, much better at the logical games that underlie all of the LSAT fact patterns; and (2) you really really don't love it. 

The second point should be a serious one.  Don't go to law school because someone else thinks you should, or because you think you should.  Go because you *have* to . . . you *love* it.  If, in the process of studying for the LSAT, you find that love . . . good for you.  Chances are your LSAT skills will improve substantially.  Toward that end, you'll need to focus not just on those two sources, but on many more, including the LSAC's past exams. 

Best of luck to you!

Thane.

Pumba

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 06:27:29 PM »
Wow, thank you so much for everything youíve written! Seriously, it feels good to have any kind of feedback since virtually no one takes the test here in Greece. Why pick up Law? I see your pointÖ I will reply by saying, just because. I canít explain why, I have always loved it, especially the way it combines theory with practice. I knew ever since I was little that thatís the way to go. I have been looking into it even more thoroughly the last 3 years searching for reasons that might point me another way, but I couldnít find any. Itís like when you fall in love, you canít really explain why, itís just this ďsomethingĒ. Plus, I really like the English language and I want to leave my country behind since if youĎve heard the news the situation is really nasty. Combining all these I will try to study Law in the States. To me, itís the ultimate challenge. LSAT it is, there is no going back now. Frankly, I believe that the LSAT is a good thing, here in Greece we have to study History, Latin, Literature, Ancient Greek, Composition and Biology to get into Law School. I mean, common ! Anyways, I got carried away.. Thank you again for the advice, much appreciated, I will take a test in about a week or so, I will post it right here (:

SoCalLawGuy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2012, 02:58:45 AM »
Being disappointed because of a low score at home is way better than being disappointed in failing the actual LSAT. If you say you study 5-6 hours a day (no cheating :P) you should be able to do good on the test, it depends only on how much you concentrate on things.
Good luck, by the way !

Thane Messinger

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2012, 03:49:54 AM »
* * *
 To me, itís the ultimate challenge. LSAT it is, there is no going back now. Frankly, I believe that the LSAT is a good thing, here in Greece we have to study History, Latin, Literature, Ancient Greek, Composition and Biology to get into Law School. I mean, common ! Anyways, I got carried away.. Thank you again for the advice, much appreciated, I will take a test in about a week or so, I will post it right here (:

Pumba -

Excellent, and good luck!  Take the process seriously, and attempt to translate your energy into practical success.  Not least, focus, after each exam, on picking apart the questions.  Figure out, slowly, what the testers were looking for, and why.  What you'll find after about the 12th test is that you'll see the logical patterns again and again.  That's what you're looking for.  The English is a distraction in the sense that many tend to get caught up in that, rather than in the meaning behind the words. 

A radical question:  If you like the energy of America (and, yes, there is that), have you considered the MBA?  I'm not trying to dissuade you, but the MBA is focused in the types of practical business--the use of risk--rather than the management of risk (as in law).  Both are viable options, depending upon your desires.

Good luck!

Thane.

Thane Messinger

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2012, 03:53:52 AM »
Being disappointed because of a low score at home is way better than being disappointed in failing the actual LSAT. If you say you study 5-6 hours a day ...


I would second this.  5-6 hours of *serious* study for the LSAT is a good benchmark.  One test and 2-3 hours (or more) to dissect the answers and reasoning.*  If you can maintain that you will make progress!

Thane.

* No shortcuts here.  Most want to Just Take The Exam!  Instead, take apart each answer so that you know not just what was right, but also what was wrong--and for each and all, why.

Pumba

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2012, 07:17:41 AM »
Thane -

Thank you for you encouraging words, that is exactly how I regard this entire LSAT process and how I act, seriously and above all I believe that dedication is the key. I have seen great improvement after the first 15+ hours of studying and I will agree with you the most important part is to take your time and look back, make sure you understand each and every question, why they are not correct and why the correct one is not wrong. However, I have two exams on the 26th and 28th of September and I am confused as I will have to skip studying for the LSAT for 6 whole days - that leaves me exactly 2 months for the December LSAT.

The truth is that I have not considered the MBA. I will definitely look into it at some point. If I may ask, I have the two bibles for the Logic Games and the Logical Reasoning, what should I look for concerning the Reading Comprehension?

regards,

Thane Messinger

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
    • View Profile
Re: Greece takes on the LSAT
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2012, 02:14:13 AM »
Thank you for you encouraging words, that is exactly how I regard this entire LSAT process and how I act, seriously and above all I believe that dedication is the key. I have seen great improvement after the first 15+ hours of studying and I will agree with you the most important part is to take your time and look back, make sure you understand each and every question, why they are not correct and why the correct one is not wrong. However, I have two exams on the 26th and 28th of September and I am confused as I will have to skip studying for the LSAT for 6 whole days - that leaves me exactly 2 months for the December LSAT.

The truth is that I have not considered the MBA. I will definitely look into it at some point. If I may ask, I have the two bibles for the Logic Games and the Logical Reasoning, what should I look for concerning the Reading Comprehension?


You're most welcome.  I wouldn't be worried about a temporary break.  In fact, it might be helpful in terms of allowing your mind time to regroup.  What's important is not time, per se; what's important is focus.  So disengage, without guilt, for that period; take and ace your tests; and re-engage when you can.  (And don't try to do both.  Multi-tasking is bad.  Do one thing at a time and do it well.)

As to the theologically jurisprudential references, the true answer is "either and all"--the specific reference is less important than the actual focus.  If a specific reference suits you better, great.  But even there it's probably better to use the other resource(s) as a counterbalance and a way to make sure your mind is truly focusing on the substance rather than the particular style.  The actual LSAC structure is not identical.

Go get 'em.  = :   )

Thane.