Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: talk to me...  (Read 1188 times)

ascend

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
    • Email
talk to me...
« on: September 05, 2012, 12:26:24 AM »
I've tried several schools before I finally fought off my demons, settled in, and kicked ass.
Currently I have a 3.65 cum/gpa, and will graduate in the fall.

Why am I writing this.. because I suck on practice LSAT's.
First time I took it, I scored a 133, second time 135 (all timed).

I have a criminal record, all of them misdermeanors, I didn't transfer my grades from one school to another because I felt a fresh start academically was the best way to go.

Since returning, I will be finishing my undergrad in three and half years, will graduate cum or magna cum laud, have attained a degree in CD Counseling AAS, maintained a 4.0 for my first three years, gone back to church and was asked to preach a couple of times, got on the USA Today All-State & All-USA academic teams, been featured in a couple of newspapers, interned for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, and have gotten engaged (I made it rain bling on top of the empire state building) to the love of my life, have been given over $20,000 in scholarships, got the chance to enroll at my dream university, UT-Austin, for a summer, and made straight A's.  I run marathons, work out religious, lost 20 pounds, and I just started martial arts.
Not to mention, I haven't gotten anything more than a speeding ticket in like 4 years or so, plus I beat a terrible addiction that almost took my life.

I want to go into law. Basically I want to serve people in that capacity.  Why? Because it's a challenge, its interesting, it motivates me.
I don't have any reason to believe that I would make tons of money, clerk at the federal level, or even become a high profile attorney, but for one reason or another I have this unshakeable belief that if I were to practice law, I would be good at it.

So what's my question: I am scoring in the 130's consistently.... I just finished my last pre-test which put me at the 135 mark. (I raised my score by two points)
Although the law would allow me to practice and take the bar in my state, my question is, will a law school accept me?
I am willing to do the work, in fact I study everyday damn day for this test, for hours.
I signed up for the October test, but my pretests are telling me that if I were to take it, I would score low at this point.
I took a weekend course which just woke me up to the fact that I am not where I need to be if I am seriously attempting to enter a decent school.

I am looking for honest opinions.... it will probably shape my future decisions whether I should continue pursuing this career goal or if I am just chasing a pipe dream again. I wasted a lot of time maturing, and that last thing I want to do is throw myself into something where I never had a chance.

I remember the days when I slept in parks, asking people for change, pissing behind dumpsters, sleeping in pool houses, diving into pools so I can take take a bath, not eating anything for days sometimes....

This has the potential to be part of one of the greatest comeback stories of all time...
Maybe I'm just venting... or maybe I am looking for a ray of light.
Hit me back. 


Maintain FL 350

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2012, 02:40:01 AM »
There are a few things to address, but the major issues are your LSAT prep and criminal record.

LSAT

As you already know, 135 will not get you into law school. Here's the good news: You've only taken two practice tests, and you've got time to raise your score. What I find curious (and what may be the bad news) is that your GPA is so out of step with your LSAT practice scores. This may mean that your study methods are ineffective or that you have a mental block which needs to be overcome.

Either way, you need to do a critical self-evaluation of your strengths and weaknesses, and identify the problem(s). You'll never be able to improve if you don't clearly understand exactly what's causing you to stumble. Is it test anxiety, reading too slowly, misunderstanding what the question is asking? I found when I was studying that going through each individual question and really understanding why I got it wrong or right was hugely helpful. When you understand why you got a question right, you start to understand what the testmakers are looking for.

A lot of what the LSAT is seeking to measure is not readily apparent. The LSAT uses its own specific verbage in order to tip you off as to what it's looking for, and you've got to learn to decipher its code. I would highly recommend a prep course with a live instructor, I think it works better than just studying on your own or online. You've got to get the unbiased, objective opinion of a disinterested party to compliment and (if necessary) re-direct your self evaluation. A weekend course probably isn't enough, and you may need to find a way to dedicate more time to prep.

The LSAT is a standardized, learnable test. After a while, you'll start to recognize patterns and be able to anticipate the answer. 

Criminal Record

I don't know what your specific problems were, or how long ago. I doubt if misdemeanors would keep you out of law school, as long as some time has passed and you fully disclose the issues. Failure to disclose is often a much bigger deal than the crime itself. Don't lie about your record, or try to step around it. Full and frank disclosure is the key.

As far as bar admission, I don't know how your state treats misdemeanors. In my state, California, misdemeanors would probably not be a problem unless they were recent or involved dishonesty. Of course, full disclosure is required. Texas may or may not have the same attitude. Check with the state bar.

Lastly, congratulations on overcoming some daunting odds on your path to law school (and life!). Good luck with everything .

EarlCat

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2533
  • i'm in ur LSAT blowin' ur curve
    • AOL Instant Messenger - EarlCat78
    • View Profile
    • EarlDoesLSAT.com
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 10:13:06 PM »
There are a few things to address, but the major issues are your LSAT prep and criminal record.

LSAT

As you already know, 135 will not get you into law school. Here's the good news: You've only taken two practice tests, and you've got time to raise your score. What I find curious (and what may be the bad news) is that your GPA is so out of step with your LSAT practice scores. This may mean that
your study methods are ineffective or that you have a mental block which needs to be overcome.

Either way, you need to do a critical self-evaluation of your strengths and weaknesses, and identify the problem(s). You'll never be able to improve if you don't clearly understand exactly what's causing you to stumble. Is it test anxiety, reading too slowly, misunderstanding what the question is asking? I found when I was studying that going through each individual question and really understanding why I got it wrong or right was hugely helpful. When you understand why you got a question right, you start to understand what the testmakers are looking for.

A lot of what the LSAT is seeking to measure is not readily apparent. The LSAT uses its own specific verbage in order to tip you off as to what it's looking for, and you've got to learn to decipher its code.
I would highly recommend a prep course with a live instructor , I think it works better than just studying on your own or online. You've got to get the unbiased, objective opinion of a disinterested party to compliment and (if necessary) re-direct your self evaluation. A weekend course probably isn't enough, and you may need to find a way to dedicate more time to prep.

The LSAT is a standardized, learnable test. After a while, you'll start to recognize patterns and be able to anticipate the answer. 

Criminal Record

I don't know what your specific problems were, or how long ago. I doubt if misdemeanors would keep you out of law school, as long as some time has passed and you fully disclose the issues. Failure to disclose is often a much bigger deal than the crime itself. Don't lie about your record, or try to step around it. Full and frank disclosure is the key.

As far as bar admission, I don't know how your state treats misdemeanors. In my state, California, misdemeanors would probably not be a problem unless they were recent or involved dishonesty. Of course, full disclosure is required. Texas may or may not have the same attitude. Check with the state bar.

Lastly, congratulations on overcoming some daunting odds on your path to law school (and life!). Good luck with everything .


cooley3L

  • Guest
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 12:10:27 AM »
LSDAS looks at your cumulative GPA. This means even if you didn't transfer the grades, even if you only took one class at a school and bombed it, it all counts. Your graduating GPA means less than what it comes to cumulative. Is it fair? Probably not.    But it is how they do it.

Just a heads up

PS
I know a lot of people with DUI's who are lawyers. Just saying, in case it helps any.

ascend

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2012, 07:41:09 PM »
When I turn in my trascripts to LDAS, will I get to know their assigned cumlative grade for me?

cooley3L

  • Guest
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2012, 08:12:56 PM »
When I turn in my trascripts to LDAS, will I get to know their assigned cumlative grade for me?
I believe that it is viewable as part of your file online.

It has been awhile so I don't recall exactly how to pull it up, but if you ask them, they should be able to tell it to you.

In theory you can figure it out yourself by looking at old transcripts and then using an online GPA calculator. http://www.back2college.com/gpa.htm

SoCalLawGuy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
    • View Profile
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2012, 03:04:43 AM »
EarlCat got directly to the point: a weekend course is nothing, you should study harder and take up a "real" prep course. Why didn't you transfer the grades? Wouldn't that help you a lot ?

Maintain FL 350

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: talk to me...
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2012, 12:58:09 PM »
OP:

EarlCat seems to think that a criminal record is irrelevant. It's not. Depending on where you live, what crimes you committed, and how long ago it happened, you could be prevented from bar admission. Some states are easy on this stuff, some are not.

Check with the TX state bar before spending 150k on a law degree.