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Author Topic: 2-3 years before 1L  (Read 8992 times)

n00dles

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2-3 years before 1L
« on: August 28, 2012, 06:16:10 PM »
I was recently hired by a tier 1 university and will be permitted to study there for free (first to obtain a Bachelor's) after one year of employment. I have been briefing and reviewing some of the more famous cases (Sibron, Garner, Quarles, etc) in preparation. For those who've attended law school, what knowledge did you lack your first year and how should I go about acquiring the necessary skills that will help me succeed? I don't plan on studying for the LSAT because of the guaranteed admission policy for employees, so I'd like to spend my downtime on something that will help me out next year. I've been recommended "Getting to Maybe", any related literature would be greatly appreciated.

Maintain FL 350

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Re: 2-3 years before 1L
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2012, 07:07:27 PM »
Highly suspicious, but what the hell.

Assuming that you are who you say you are, an employee of a Tier 1 university, and that your university has some sort of admissions agreement for employees, it seems highly unlikely that the offer is totally unqualified. Are you saying that if you had a 2.0 GPA and 140 LSAT you'd still get in because you're an employee? What university are we talking about?

I'd re-read that policy carefully before blowing off the LSAT.




cooley3L

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Re: 2-3 years before 1L
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 12:17:34 PM »
just focus on getting the BA, at this point anything else is just irrelevant. Most don't even take the lsat until at least junior year. Your only focus should be on keeping your GPA high at this point.

The undergrad you attend also has very little to do with admissions to law school. They care more about GPA and LSAT scores than where you went.

SoCalLawGuy

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Re: 2-3 years before 1L
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2012, 03:12:29 AM »
Why don't you study for the LSAT anyway? You might learn a thing or two and, if for some reason, you'll be required to take it you'll be prepared.

Thane Messinger

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Re: 2-3 years before 1L
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 04:53:08 PM »
I was recently hired by a tier 1 university and will be permitted to study there for free (first to obtain a Bachelor's) after one year of employment. I have been briefing and reviewing some of the more famous cases (Sibron, Garner, Quarles, etc) in preparation. For those who've attended law school, what knowledge did you lack your first year and how should I go about acquiring the necessary skills that will help me succeed? I don't plan on studying for the LSAT because of the guaranteed admission policy for employees, so I'd like to spend my downtime on something that will help me out next year. I've been recommended "Getting to Maybe", any related literature would be greatly appreciated.

Noodles -

First (and for all), excellent move.  Not only is this a tremendous perk, but most schools within systems offer this anywhere within the system, and some have agreements with other schools that allow for such benefits.  For anyone at the bachelor's level and above, this just about doubles the salary one nominally gets.  (This usually applies to family members as well.)  The only other option along these lines are the post-911 benefits offered via military service.

Roald is correct; the benefit applies to tuition, not to admissions.  So you will still need to do very, very well.  Thus your focus is quite right.

Okay, as to prep:  What you're about to read is a "minority opinion" among those giving such advice.  You and everyone *should* prepare prior to law school.  Most of the advice you will read and hear is the opposite:  relax, get drunk, don't worry, be happy.

All right:  Now for the caveat:  The reverse is in agreement with Cooley, in that your immediate concern is to do exceptionally well in your college program.  SoCal is also correct in that your second concern is to prepare for the LSAT.  Those two factors will by far dominate in your application process.

As to the references:

Law School Undercover, by "Professor X."  A behind-the scenes look at law school and the admissions process.

Law School Fast Track (and for you College Fast Track), both by Derrick Hibbard, and both focusing on the importance of good habits. 

and, if I might:

Law School: Getting In, Getting Good, Getting the Gold.  The focus is on cutting through the nonsense of law school towards better grades with less wasted effort and (much) less stress.

I hope this helps,

Thane.