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Author Topic: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!  (Read 1951 times)

jack24

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Re: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2012, 04:46:56 PM »
If you want to teach, can you get an assistant teacher job at a law school, or teach at a community college (both I doubt require a PhD)

I already adjunct at a State University.  MY JD counts as a Ph.D. for their statistical purposes.   I really love it, and I'd like to do that full time.  Unfortunately, the opportunities for full time faculty employment are slim for a J.D. only.

cooley3L

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Re: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2012, 12:05:51 PM »
If you want to teach, can you get an assistant teacher job at a law school, or teach at a community college (both I doubt require a PhD)

I already adjunct at a State University.  MY JD counts as a Ph.D. for their statistical purposes.   I really love it, and I'd like to do that full time.  Unfortunately, the opportunities for full time faculty employment are slim for a J.D. only.
Well if its a job requiment for the job you want, sounds like you have the answer right there.

That being said, have you thought about taking your teaching experience and JD to apply for a law Prof job? Almost none of law school Profs ever get anything beyond the JD.

jack24

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Re: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2012, 02:28:47 PM »
I've considered teaching law, but it's incredibly competitive and mostly reserved for those with better educational credentials than I have..  There are far less law schools than there are undergrad institutions.

Maintain FL 350

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Re: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2012, 04:11:33 PM »
I've considered teaching law, but it's incredibly competitive and mostly reserved for those with better educational credentials than I have..  There are far less law schools than there are undergrad institutions.

I've run into the same issue. I'd love to teach law, and I think I'd be good at it, but my J.D. is not from an elite institution. I have a couple of friends who graduated from the same law school that I did, and they've been able to pick up adjunct/clinical classes. Full time, tenure track positions, however, are another story. Even at many T4s it's not unusual to find Harvard/Yale/Columbia grads with federal clerkship experience. I've met a few full time profs who went to places like UCLA, Texas, and Washington, but they all had some other unique experience that made them marketable.

The vast majority of law students would be better served by law schools' hiring great teachers rather than great academicians. It's yet another example of the obvious disconnect between the academy's notion of legal education as a purely intellectual pursuit, and the reality of forging a career in law, which most grads will be confronted with. 

cooley3L

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Re: The Sunk Cost Fallacy: Help me!
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2012, 08:48:38 PM »
I've considered teaching law, but it's incredibly competitive and mostly reserved for those with better educational credentials than I have..  There are far less law schools than there are undergrad institutions.
Not sure if this helps, but Cooley tends to employ people in it's "Legal Research And Writing" classes as Adjunct Profs who havn't even passed the bar yet. (with 5 current campuses and more no doubt planned they take pretty much anyone with a JD who wants it)

Not sure if that interests you any, but if you wanted to teach law in either Florida or Michigan it may be an idea to get your shoe in the law school Prof door.