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Author Topic: FYLSE or FYLSX - passed? today CA BAR releases June 2012 results  (Read 4944 times)

jonlevy

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Re: FYLSE or FYLSX - passed? today CA BAR releases June 2012 results
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2013, 10:25:44 PM »
No matter what the rubric is - essay question grading is subjective.  Additionally, the passing cut off on other portions can be jacked up as opposed to other states.  Do they manipulate it, sure they do, that's why the pass rate is lower than other states. 

jennid1234

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Re: FYLSE or FYLSX - passed? today CA BAR releases June 2012 results
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2013, 02:27:49 PM »
The essays may be subjective in grading but it you don't spot the issues, know the rule statements and can't analyze to why someone should or should not be found guilty of murder (for example) then you won't pass. 

The state manipulates the results. Why? The goal is qualify students who don't attend traditional law school or who failed first year at an ABA law school.  I failed the first time by a close margin. In October 2012, I scored higher and the degree of difficulty was less, so I passed.  I am a better student now because of the FYLSE. CLS gives sufficient preparation to pass but I didn't attend everything they offered.  Bottom line, I just wasn't prepared enough the first time around.  I know intelligent people who failed the test too. So many variables to taking any test, who writes the questions, who grades, the degree a difficulty, preparation, health, working and sleep all play a factor in the results. 

jonlevy

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Re: FYLSE or FYLSX - passed? today CA BAR releases June 2012 results
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2013, 07:19:35 PM »
Anyone who has a familiarity for multivariate statistics and quantitative analysis could explain how it is very easy to take raw data (test scores) and achieve the desired results.  I am not saying it is done that way, I am just saying if a State Bar wanted a 20% pass rate it can more or less achieve it by manipulating the data.  I just find find it odd that those FYLSE exam takers always fail 80% of the time or conversely always pass 20% of the time.