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Author Topic: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?  (Read 789 times)

bsktbll28082

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Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« on: July 18, 2012, 10:37:05 AM »
First time poster here. I actually was on TLS for a little while. It was really cut throat; this place seems a lot better.

I was wondering if, say, you apply to Law School X and you also apply to Business School X. Does the fact you applied to their other school hold any weight? Perhaps show how committed you are to going there? This would be to pursue, in this example, a JD/MBA at School X.

Thanks!
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IrrX

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2012, 02:24:19 PM »
No, it really doesn't affect admissions to either school. Law school admissions is entirely numbers-driven, so to also apply to the business school, it only shows that you have a certain goal in mind: a JD/MBA. If they were to even notice, they would just assume you have the same goal when applying to other law schools. If there's some reason why this school is a top choice, you can write a supplemental essay on it, outlining the reasons why you feel that it's the school for you. Probably won't carry much weight in their decision, and they may not even give it more than a glance, but it's something that shows you've done your homework on the school and that you're willing to put in a little extra work.
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legend

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2012, 02:42:48 PM »
Irrx is right on point it is entirely numbers driven and at my law school the Business & Law school had very little interaction I would be surprised if the law school was even aware of your MBA application and vice versa. I know nothing about MBA programs so I won't comment, but as Irrx suggested law school admissions is 90% if not more numbers based. Or URM based or if you did something newsworthy i.e NFL Quarterback, Navy Seal during the Osama Raid, or something where you said WOW will they look past the numbers. An internship at a law-firm, or working full-time is not WOW worthy and unless you have something like that it is 90% numbers based a quick glance at law school numbers will show you that.

If you mentioned you really wanted a joint degree it could help, but it is not a WOW factor. It might be a brownie point in your favor and taking the time to write the addendum might push you over the top if your a marginal candidate, but it will be of little real impact.

Good luck on your apps and your law school career!

bsktbll28082

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2012, 07:55:51 PM »
legend, since you happened to mention a law firm internship, I have a follow up. I do currently intern at a law firm even though I'm in undergrad. How much should I emphasis this? I thought Law School X wouldn't care about the internship since it's their job to teach me law.

Thanks!
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legend

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2012, 08:20:33 PM »
Well first throughout your application process law school realize that anything you read comes from anonymous internet posters my advice included. So take it all with a grain of salt remember anyone can writing anything about any subject and say anything they want without repercussion myself included.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFBDn5PiL00 (Michael Scott Humor on the subject) Really take it to heart whatever you read on this board, TLS, or anywhere else is from anonymous internet posters and more often than not they have no idea what they are talking about or are crazy. So I cannot emphasize the importance of taking everything you read from anonymous posters with a grain of salt and this applies to my post as well.

First I am not a law school admissions officer I finished law school awhile ago, but I am not an authority on law school admissions all 200 ABA schools likely have some various criteria so I couldn't possibly speak as to what would work better at School X or Y.

Your current law firm internship is helpful it won't hurt to have some exposure to the law and more importantly you actually get to see what the practice of law is about. Some law students who have never seen it think it is going to be Law & Order, Franklin & Bash, type fun, but you have likely seen the law can be quite boring at times, which although not necessarily helpful for law school admissions purposes  well at least prevent you from being surprised when you find out the law is not all fun and games.

As to what you specifically write about your experience that is up to you. Your personal statement is yours and yours alone as stated by Irrx and myself law school admissions is mostly a numbers game and I am guessing with each school receiving 3,000 or so applications they are reading very few personal statements in great detail. Remember admissions officers are human beings and when 3,000 essays are placed on their desk they probably aren't going to read them to in-depth if your numbers are below or above their expectations they will probably just to you in auto-reject or auto-admit.

If your on the cusp they might take a glance and maybe Bob at Y school will be really impressed with your law firm internship. While Sara at Law School Y thinks your supervising attorney is an a-hole. You just can't say what to put in use your common sense and might as well mention your legal internship, but I doubt it will do much more than be a brownie point at best.

Again good luck




bsktbll28082

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2012, 08:45:14 PM »
Haha, yes I recognize you could just be an anonymous person trying to screw me over. But your answer helps anyway.

It's very different than what the TV shows lawyers doing. I've learned I do not want to go into this type of law, but I still love the experience. I'm not bored at all.

Considering a lot of people applying will have even more impressive jobs/credential/etc. it probably won't help much. I might just leave it on my resume and not write about it in my personal statement.

Gracias.
If the facts are against you, use the law. If the law is against you, use the facts. If the facts and law are against you, argue.

jack24

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Re: Joint Degree- Does it help your application?
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2012, 11:22:08 AM »
I love Legend's disclaimers.   It's like his state bar has a professional responsibility section about full disclosure during online career advice discussions.

bsktbl:

If you apply to a joint degree you may get some preference.  I only say this because I know my school said so.  I knew a JD/MBA, a JD/MD, a JD/Masters in Econ, and a JD/Masters in Journalism.

Surprisingly, my school didn't seem to have any JD/MAC students.  Maybe I just didn't know them.

I think you need to consider, more so than the admissions benefit, the utility of having a joint degree after graduation.   I believe there is some benefit, but it is pretty limited unless you have some specific goal that requires it. (Maybe getting a masters in computer science would qualify you for the patent bar or something like that).

Is a JD/CPA more valuable than a JD/Bachelors in Accounting?   I used to think so, but my two buddies in tax law say nobody cares.  Maybe they are wrong, I don't know.

One more thing, if you end up on the waitlist somewhere, I think pushing the joint degree possibility could help you get accepted off the waitlist.