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Author Topic: LLM in tax without a JD  (Read 5978 times)

michaeltrout

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2013, 12:18:30 PM »
UF, and probably most all schools will list a J.D. as a basic requirement to their LLM program.
Most schools will also make exceptions to those basic requirements under acceptable circumstances.
Getting an LLM without a JD is a feasible idea, if you're a tax manager with 15 years experience looking to get promoted to Director.
It's pretty common knowledge in a Big Four practice office what an LLM is, and nobody wants/needs a JD.
The OP was just graduating with their MACC so getting an LLM without a JD is probably a terrible idea since they're decades away from the position that would need it.
A masters in tax would be a much better option since it will correlate directly with what their job will entail.

Citylaw

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2013, 08:02:01 PM »
That makes sense I imagine no school offering a Tax Law LLM would be opposed to having a tuition paying  tax professional in their school.

I also imagine the restrictions on LLM's are not as strict as those for a J.D. program so they could make exceptions along the way.

 Out of curiosity I did a quick Google search to determine if the ABA even regulates LLM's, but came up with varying results  does anyone know if the ABA regulates LLM's?


Maintain FL 350

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2013, 10:07:34 PM »
Out of curiosity I did a quick Google search to determine if the ABA even regulates LLM's, but came up with varying results  does anyone know if the ABA regulates LLM's?

I think the ABA only accredits JD programs, "the first degree in law" as they say. As far as LL.M programs, it seems to be left up to the individual school to determine the requirements, standards, etc.

I suppose a school certainly could accept a non-JD if they wanted. Anything to keep that tuition rolling in. I'd be curious as to how a non-lawyer perceives LL.M level legal studies? I've never studied tax law at that level, but I assume that a foundation in civil procedure, evidence, and con law would  be helpful to really flesh out the meaning of the statutes? Then again, maybe LL.M programs are different from JD studies and don't necessarily require the broader foundation.

livinglegend

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2013, 10:59:14 AM »
I imagine a tax professional interested in an LLM would have encountered statutes etc in their career and be able to understand a Tax Law course. I took one tax course in law school and I had no idea what was going on so a tax professional might be more prepared than someone with a J.D and now tax experience.

jonlevy

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2013, 09:18:46 PM »
Yes you can practice as a non attorney before the US Tax Court, you will need to pass an exam. plus have 2 sponsors.  You don't need a LLM but that might be one way to get in and make connections.

https://www.ustaxcourt.gov/rules/Title_XX.pdf

Citylaw

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Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2013, 09:09:56 PM »
Good info and very responsive to the question. This board has some great posters.