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2011 Employment Prospects worst in 18 Years

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jack24:
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2012/06/08/law-school-class-of-2011-jobs-data-shows-18-year-low/

I understand that the economy is tough in other careers as well, but this is still interesting.  34% of law graduates from the class of 2011 are working in a job that doesn't require a law license.

FalconJimmy:

--- Quote from: jack24 on June 11, 2012, 10:42:13 AM ---http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2012/06/08/law-school-class-of-2011-jobs-data-shows-18-year-low/
34% of law graduates from the class of 2011 are working in a job that doesn't require a law license.

--- End quote ---

That really doesn't surprise me so much.  Until about 1970 or so, it was very common for people with law degrees to go into industry instead of the law.  Late 60s, early 70s is when new associate pay started to outpace private sector pay. 

A law degree's most obvious application is in the law, but we might be better served as a nation if a lot more JDs took their understanding of the law into private industry and didn't necessarily go into practice as attorneys.

jack24:

--- Quote from: FalconJimmy on June 11, 2012, 11:11:54 AM ---That really doesn't surprise me so much.  Until about 1970 or so, it was very common for people with law degrees to go into industry instead of the law.  Late 60s, early 70s is when new associate pay started to outpace private sector pay. 

A law degree's most obvious application is in the law, but we might be better served as a nation if a lot more JDs took their understanding of the law into private industry and didn't necessarily go into practice as attorneys.

--- End quote ---

Sure, but most students entering law school calculate the potential return on investment based on wages for jobs that require a law degree.  Paying $50,000 to $135,000 in tuition to go to law school to work in an industry is a big risk, but if that is your intention then fine.  I just think far more than 66% of new law students have a desire to work in a field that requires a law license.

legend:
I would have to say it is not that surprising either particularly considering many people at my school had no desire to be a lawyer and said so numerous times. Many wanted a J.D. to open a business, some came from rich families and wanted an educational experience, then I imagine that stat doesnt' account for students that never passed the bar as well.

It is almost not that surprising it is an 18 year low there are so many start-up companies with young people at the helm doing things that don't require a law license, which would also account for that stat. As an example one of the lawyers at my firm simply left to join his friends start up that did some kind of hippie/food thing. His position is not as an attorney, but some kind of business develpment. The organic food thing is what   he was really into and no law license is required for his current job. This type of situation is pretty common nower days. In the 70's, 80's and so on people were much more likley to stay at a company for 20-30 years. Recent graduates today are much more mobile and try many different paths.

Maybe it is just the economy and law school is a scam, but the above reasons could certainly play into these stats.  Furthermore, I would imagine the stats that were kept 18 years ago were not as accurate. Computers & the interent have made tracking stats much easier and still they are unreliable particularly for employment data. I personally never reported my info to my school even though I was employed. I had nothing against my school I just never got around to it and so I would have been unreported. Everybody draws an inference like it is the school's responsibilty to track down their grads, but most people probably move change their contact info and simply forget law school ever existed once they pass the bar and trying to impress their clients & boss.

Again it could be the market is terrible I graduated before 2009, but I have seen lawyers that were admitted after I was in courtrooms so there is work out there.

It is an interesting article though thanks for posting. Just offering some counter-arguments for entertainment.

Maintain FL 350:
Those numbers don't surprise me one bit. The market is bad right now, and may remain that way for years. I wonder, however, how many recent grads simply refuse to accept jobs that they think are "beneath" them? Do alot of young grads have a $$$ figure in mind, and refuse to work for less? I'm also surpised by how many grads refuse to go into solo practice. Don't get me wrong, I'm fully aware of how tough it would be to start up a solo practice fresh out of law school. But if I'd been looking for a job unsuccessfully for nine months, I'd take anything.

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