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Author Topic: Process of Transferring From COOLEY  (Read 9085 times)

Nova Juris

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2012, 09:53:49 PM »
Everybody is right so far, it seems.  I just thought I'd mention that you don't have to be in the top 10% to transfer per se.  I know plenty of people (even with those pedestrian gpas) who transferred from Cooley a couple years ago.  It really entirely depends on where you are applying and who else is applying to transfer to that school.  In fact, I know someone who transferred to a tier 2 from Cooley who was ranked in the top 40%.  Just something to keep in mind. 

That being said, waiting and getting a higher LSAT score is probably the best move.  Like everyone said, there is no guarantee when you're talking about transferring.  Random hits on your other questions next....

I took 12 units a semester instead of 15 when at Cooley.  I found it very manageable, especially compared to fellow students taking 15. 
You will likely need a letter from a professor.  I found it somewhat difficult to get one from a professor at Cooley (some wouldn't do it at all while others required you receive an A in their class).
I don't think you can reasonably expect to transfer after 2 yrs.  Most schools cap the amount of units you can transfer (usually around 30-34).  I guess it may be possible, but you'd be wasting 30 units you paid for.   

Definitely call schools you are considering and see what is generally required for an acceptance.  I think LSAC contains this information as well.

where did they transfer to and what was their cumulative gpa?

They had a 3.0 and transferred to a tier 2.  I can't imagine why you'd need more information than that.

to see which schools are taking cooley transfers in the bottom 40%.

kjw5029

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2012, 02:15:44 AM »
Everybody is right so far, it seems.  I just thought I'd mention that you don't have to be in the top 10% to transfer per se.  I know plenty of people (even with those pedestrian gpas) who transferred from Cooley a couple years ago.  It really entirely depends on where you are applying and who else is applying to transfer to that school.  In fact, I know someone who transferred to a tier 2 from Cooley who was ranked in the top 40%.  Just something to keep in mind. 

That being said, waiting and getting a higher LSAT score is probably the best move.  Like everyone said, there is no guarantee when you're talking about transferring.  Random hits on your other questions next....

I took 12 units a semester instead of 15 when at Cooley.  I found it very manageable, especially compared to fellow students taking 15. 
You will likely need a letter from a professor.  I found it somewhat difficult to get one from a professor at Cooley (some wouldn't do it at all while others required you receive an A in their class).
I don't think you can reasonably expect to transfer after 2 yrs.  Most schools cap the amount of units you can transfer (usually around 30-34).  I guess it may be possible, but you'd be wasting 30 units you paid for.   

Definitely call schools you are considering and see what is generally required for an acceptance.  I think LSAC contains this information as well.

where did they transfer to and what was their cumulative gpa?

They had a 3.0 and transferred to a tier 2.  I can't imagine why you'd need more information than that.

to see which schools are taking cooley transfers in the bottom 40%.

If you're transferring from Cooley yourself and you're in the top 40%, I'd be happy to give  you that information.  If you're not, again, I can't imagine why you would need more information than what I've already given (unless, of course, you are attempting to troll).

Nova Juris

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2012, 03:04:05 PM »
Everybody is right so far, it seems.  I just thought I'd mention that you don't have to be in the top 10% to transfer per se.  I know plenty of people (even with those pedestrian gpas) who transferred from Cooley a couple years ago.  It really entirely depends on where you are applying and who else is applying to transfer to that school.  In fact, I know someone who transferred to a tier 2 from Cooley who was ranked in the top 40%.  Just something to keep in mind. 

That being said, waiting and getting a higher LSAT score is probably the best move.  Like everyone said, there is no guarantee when you're talking about transferring.  Random hits on your other questions next....

I took 12 units a semester instead of 15 when at Cooley.  I found it very manageable, especially compared to fellow students taking 15. 
You will likely need a letter from a professor.  I found it somewhat difficult to get one from a professor at Cooley (some wouldn't do it at all while others required you receive an A in their class).
I don't think you can reasonably expect to transfer after 2 yrs.  Most schools cap the amount of units you can transfer (usually around 30-34).  I guess it may be possible, but you'd be wasting 30 units you paid for.   

Definitely call schools you are considering and see what is generally required for an acceptance.  I think LSAC contains this information as well.

where did they transfer to and what was their cumulative gpa?

They had a 3.0 and transferred to a tier 2.  I can't imagine why you'd need more information than that.

to see which schools are taking cooley transfers in the bottom 40%.

If you're transferring from Cooley yourself and you're in the top 40%, I'd be happy to give  you that information.  If you're not, again, I can't imagine why you would need more information than what I've already given (unless, of course, you are attempting to troll).

When did I say I was doing it? Do you know how to read? I am saying it doesn't happen. I am calling you a lier. Moron.

kjw5029

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2012, 04:03:31 PM »
Everybody is right so far, it seems.  I just thought I'd mention that you don't have to be in the top 10% to transfer per se.  I know plenty of people (even with those pedestrian gpas) who transferred from Cooley a couple years ago.  It really entirely depends on where you are applying and who else is applying to transfer to that school.  In fact, I know someone who transferred to a tier 2 from Cooley who was ranked in the top 40%.  Just something to keep in mind. 

That being said, waiting and getting a higher LSAT score is probably the best move.  Like everyone said, there is no guarantee when you're talking about transferring.  Random hits on your other questions next....

I took 12 units a semester instead of 15 when at Cooley.  I found it very manageable, especially compared to fellow students taking 15. 
You will likely need a letter from a professor.  I found it somewhat difficult to get one from a professor at Cooley (some wouldn't do it at all while others required you receive an A in their class).
I don't think you can reasonably expect to transfer after 2 yrs.  Most schools cap the amount of units you can transfer (usually around 30-34).  I guess it may be possible, but you'd be wasting 30 units you paid for.   

Definitely call schools you are considering and see what is generally required for an acceptance.  I think LSAC contains this information as well.

where did they transfer to and what was their cumulative gpa?

They had a 3.0 and transferred to a tier 2.  I can't imagine why you'd need more information than that.

to see which schools are taking cooley transfers in the bottom 40%.

If you're transferring from Cooley yourself and you're in the top 40%, I'd be happy to give  you that information.  If you're not, again, I can't imagine why you would need more information than what I've already given (unless, of course, you are attempting to troll).

When did I say I was doing it? Do you know how to read? I am saying it doesn't happen. I am calling you a lier. Moron.

If you read my post I said, "If you're transferring from Cooley...."  I did not say you were.  Anyhow, time to move along troll.  You'll find no feeding from me. 

Nova Juris

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2012, 04:25:13 PM »
Everybody is right so far, it seems.  I just thought I'd mention that you don't have to be in the top 10% to transfer per se.  I know plenty of people (even with those pedestrian gpas) who transferred from Cooley a couple years ago.  It really entirely depends on where you are applying and who else is applying to transfer to that school.  In fact, I know someone who transferred to a tier 2 from Cooley who was ranked in the top 40%.  Just something to keep in mind. 

That being said, waiting and getting a higher LSAT score is probably the best move.  Like everyone said, there is no guarantee when you're talking about transferring.  Random hits on your other questions next....

I took 12 units a semester instead of 15 when at Cooley.  I found it very manageable, especially compared to fellow students taking 15. 
You will likely need a letter from a professor.  I found it somewhat difficult to get one from a professor at Cooley (some wouldn't do it at all while others required you receive an A in their class).
I don't think you can reasonably expect to transfer after 2 yrs.  Most schools cap the amount of units you can transfer (usually around 30-34).  I guess it may be possible, but you'd be wasting 30 units you paid for.   

Definitely call schools you are considering and see what is generally required for an acceptance.  I think LSAC contains this information as well.

where did they transfer to and what was their cumulative gpa?

They had a 3.0 and transferred to a tier 2.  I can't imagine why you'd need more information than that.

to see which schools are taking cooley transfers in the bottom 40%.

If you're transferring from Cooley yourself and you're in the top 40%, I'd be happy to give  you that information.  If you're not, again, I can't imagine why you would need more information than what I've already given (unless, of course, you are attempting to troll).

When did I say I was doing it? Do you know how to read? I am saying it doesn't happen. I am calling you a lier. Moron.

If you read my post I said, "If you're transferring from Cooley...."  I did not say you were.  Anyhow, time to move along troll.  You'll find no feeding from me.

so you bothered to post an "if" to a scenario you knew was not plausible? Ok, who sounds like the "troll" now. The person posting that BS and lies about bottom half transfering out of cooley with no proof or ability to name a single school, or the person posting the cold hard reality? There you go winner.

Julie Fern

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2012, 08:50:00 PM »
If you havn't started yet and plan to transfer don't go. Just raise your LSAT and (if possible) try to take a few extra classes that are blow off to raise your undergrad GPA. (If going to cooley I am guessing you don't have your full BA)

There are going to be people there who have a 160 LSAT and 4.0 undergad GPA who are attending just for the full ride. They will be the top 10% of your class. They won't want to transfer but will be the only ones other school truely want. The curve will make that happen.

If you can't stand Cooley don't go. If you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly dismissed. You just can't. Expect 5 years at Cooley if you go.

it not work that way, dipshit.  apparently he already have ungrad degree, so it too late raise cugpa for law school admission purposes.

julie going be watching you.

Julie Fern

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2012, 08:51:14 PM »
Of course the LSAT isn't perfect, no test is. However, as you point out, the LSAT is a dependable predictor of academic aptitude (the exact thing it is designed to predict!). It stands to reason that in most cases a student with a high LSAT score will out perform those with lower scores. The LSAT is not supposed to approximate the law school experience, it just measures ability.

You're right. But what I took issue with was Nova Juris saying, "if you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly [sic] dismissed." That statement is just plain ludicrous.

yes.  nj numbnuts.

Julie Fern

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2012, 08:52:08 PM »
Of course the LSAT isn't perfect, no test is. However, as you point out, the LSAT is a dependable predictor of academic aptitude (the exact thing it is designed to predict!). It stands to reason that in most cases a student with a high LSAT score will out perform those with lower scores. The LSAT is not supposed to approximate the law school experience, it just measures ability.

You're right. But what I took issue with was Nova Juris saying, "if you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly [sic] dismissed." That statement is just plain ludicrous.

It's ludicrous to expect them to graduate, true. A third don't even make 2L. True.

prove it, frat boy.

Julie Fern

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2012, 08:52:52 PM »
If you havn't started yet and plan to transfer don't go. Just raise your LSAT and (if possible) try to take a few extra classes that are blow off to raise your undergrad GPA. (If going to cooley I am guessing you don't have your full BA)

There are going to be people there who have a 160 LSAT and 4.0 undergad GPA who are attending just for the full ride. They will be the top 10% of your class. They won't want to transfer but will be the only ones other school truely want. The curve will make that happen.

If you can't stand Cooley don't go. If you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly dismissed. You just can't. Expect 5 years at Cooley if you go.

You act as if there's a perfect correlation between one's LSAT score and law school success. While it's true that the LSAT is a very dependable indicator of one's academic ability, it is far from perfect. For instance, when in law school have you ever been asked to perform the same task that is asked of test takers on LSAT logic games? Never, I suspect.

The LSAT is a gatekeeper, which is purposely designed to generate a bell-curved distribution of scores.

gatekeeper, based on curve..... what do you think the top 10% is based on? Low GPA and Low LSAT statisticly lower the odds of the curve helping you. Sorry if it hurts your feelings somehow. 90% of people think they can be the top 10%. Math doesn't allow it. Not that the bottom half know how to do that type of math mind you.

oh, so you believe in top 10% but not top 1%.

strange...

Julie Fern

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Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2012, 08:53:38 PM »
Thanks everyone for your advice. You have given me a lot to think about. I agree that I shouldn't go to Cooley if I expect to transfer. The odds are stacked against me and I should be ok with spending the next 3 years there if I have to. I know people who do go their now and do like it. I also have heard some good things regardless of its reputation. I think I can be ok with getting my law degree there, and Ill probably go part time.

I guess I am leaning toward the unlikely idea of being able to transfer because I don't want to wait and take the lsat again: mostly because I don't want to have to start paying back my student loans from undergrad since I won't be enrolled in school (btw...I did get my BA, Nova Juris :P).

I need to be realistic about this decision and I will continue to do my research, including contacting specific schools about their transfer process. Basically its not impossible to transfer but just really really hard. This was very helpful and Im going to consider alot of things before I make a decision. THANKS

For future reference: Nova Juris, there is way to be helpful in a respectful way. You are really condescending. Just something to think about.

no thinking.  he teabagger!