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Author Topic: Perks to an LLM  (Read 2713 times)

sollicitus

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2012, 08:31:44 PM »
Yes.  Raise the admission standards and erect higher barriers to getting federal loans.

People won't simply choose not to go to college.  Everyone thinks they're a special little snowflake - afterall, their mothers told them so.

Good luck telling the parents that. Don't you know their kids as special?!?!?! ;)

So I take you are against affirmitive action then? (taking that race card aspect out of it) Afterall that is the ultimate example of putting someone somewhere not due to merit but due to what they look like in the mirror.

john4040

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 01:01:22 AM »
So I take you are against affirmitive action then? (taking that race card aspect out of it) Afterall that is the ultimate example of putting someone somewhere not due to merit but due to what they look like in the mirror.

I'm not against certain forms of affirmitive action.  I think that there should be enough minority scholarships built into the system so as to make sure that minorities are adequately represented.  On the other hand, I wouldn't hand the scholarships out like candy, and they would be reserved for only the smartest within each group of minorities).

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 12:54:03 PM »
There are perks to an LLM, however those perks accrue to a very small number of students. Foreign attorneys, scholars, and tax lawyers might all benefit from an LLM assuming that it's obtained from a top law school (think NYU for tax law, etc).

Many students who graduate from non-elite law schools wrongly believe that an LLM from a more prestigious institution will give them an edge in the private sector. If they can get into a top ranked program, perhaps. An LLM from a tier 2-3, however, is probably a waste of money for the vast majority of students. I know a guy who got his JD at Loyola-New Orleans, his LLM at Duke, and was hired as a professor. I think his situation is the exception rather than the rule.

jonlevy

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 10:21:30 PM »
I'm working on a foreign LLD, the perk is that it outranks in a PhD in the Commonwealth countries and establishes on was a bonified expert. Leiden offers a LLM as do a few other schools. 

sollicitus

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2012, 08:25:58 PM »
I'm working on a foreign LLD, the perk is that it outranks in a PhD in the Commonwealth countries and establishes on was a bonified expert. Leiden offers a LLM as do a few other schools.

Do you plan to practice in those nations?

jonlevy

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2012, 09:24:07 AM »
I already do.  Anyone with 2 years PQE from certain states like California can take the bar exam for England and Wales.  The former QLTT which I took was a three day open book exam in New York. Surprisingly there were only three or four other takers.  They now have a new exam called the QLTS which I am unaware of.  Ireland offers a similar QLTT exam for California attorneys.  Not all state bars have a relationship with these countries' law societies though.

sollicitus

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2012, 08:32:25 PM »
I already do.  Anyone with 2 years PQE from certain states like California can take the bar exam for England and Wales.  The former QLTT which I took was a three day open book exam in New York. Surprisingly there were only three or four other takers.  They now have a new exam called the QLTS which I am unaware of.  Ireland offers a similar QLTT exam for California attorneys.  Not all state bars have a relationship with these countries' law societies though.

interesting, so a non-aba CA grad can have an advantage a T-1 grad from another state very likely will not have?

jonlevy

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2012, 08:51:10 PM »
Has to do with the California bar's reciprocity agreements:

http://www.lawsociety.ie/Documents/education/qltt/certofeligform.pdf

CA Law Dean

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2014, 07:46:40 PM »
I thought I might renew this discussion to get an update on current LL.M. opinions. Our law school (Monterey College of Law) is the first California accredited (non ABA) law school to offer an LL.M. Our first two students are foreign educated lawyers, neither of whom intend to practice law in the US, but will take their experience back to their home countries where they believe that it will give them a unique practice advantage. We have also had inquiries from foreign educated lawyers who wished to use the LL.M. to qualify for the California bar exam. Although this is allowed, when we outlined what we thought was actually necessary to accomplish this feat (vs. just taking their money and wishing them good luck), it is a full-time one year commitment. No one has taken up the challenge yet. Although we are facility based (not online), we have flexibility to design individual LL.M. programs. Just wondering what flavor of LL.M. Programs might be appealing? We will not do tax because we do not have the expertise. We do have unique access to international law and environmental law faculty.
Monterey College of Law
www.montereylaw.edu

jonlevy

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Re: Perks to an LLM
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2014, 01:47:50 PM »
I agree Tax is specialized and the LLM to bar exam route questionable.  There is a lot of interest in an International Law LLM but I suggest one that is focused on cross border practice as well as traditional IL.  The EU now permits a lot of cross border practice so it is not uncommon to need to be familiar with comparative law.  US lawyers are missing out on expanding their practices in transactional and corporate law, criminal defense, and as foreign legal experts.

If you ever do decide to offer an online International Law LLM - look me up - I have JD and PhD an am licensed in the US and three other countries.  Also have been instructing IL and legal Studies at the Masters Level for a couple regionally accredited online programs since 2006 and have developed several courses over the years.