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Author Topic: I have a documented Learning disablity  (Read 1571 times)

Omberon

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I have a documented Learning disablity
« on: March 07, 2012, 12:16:35 PM »
Hello everyone,

I have a well documented learning disability that severely impairs my performance on Standardized tests. Would this help my case at schools such at Harvard, Yale and Stanford? I did receive some accommodations when I took LSAT. I did not do that well, but this is expected I guess...I know that law schools do not report LSAT scores that have been accommodated so I wonder would this, along with my learning disability help my chances at getting into Harvard, Yale, and Stanford as a non-traditional student. Also I am a URM.

sollicitus

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2012, 03:16:22 PM »
The URM has nothing to do with what I am about to tell you, but it does affect your disability.

Tell your school. They will give you special accomodations (extra time on exams, etc) (seen it by the bucket loads)

The bar has a higher standard than schools, but you most likely can even get the bar to do that for you too. (or so I have been told0

cerealkiller

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2012, 11:42:45 PM »
Just curious as to how a well-documented learning disability may affect one's perceived fitness for state bar "fitness and character" considerations? 

Omberon

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 12:07:56 AM »
My post was referring more to my chances at the Law Schools of my choice (Harvard, Yale, or Stanford)

cerealkiller

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2012, 11:06:17 AM »
I realize that but I had a question of my own.

sollicitus

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2012, 01:49:50 PM »
Just curious as to how a well-documented learning disability may affect one's perceived fitness for state bar "fitness and character" considerations?

It won't harm it unless it's bad enough to affect your ability to do your job (with accomodations)

Basicly unless you are crazy or have dementia you should be fine.

Most lawyers have something wrong with them (diagnosed or not)

fortook

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2012, 06:18:03 PM »
HYS? 1) what was you LSAT score? Disability or not, you are aiming high and it will still have to be respectable. 2) "Law schools don't report accommodated LSATs."  Does that mean the schools will not accept accommodated LSATs?  If so, why would you take it? 3) I suspect this sort of issue is on a school by school basis, I would not count on any slack from HYS- they are elitist, by definition exclusive (that means the exclude people, not that they are at all better than anyone else).

Contact each respective admission office and ask them this question.  Unfortunately, the LSAT is the gatekeeper, a ridiculous and unfair one, I admit, but still- that's how it is.  There are plenty of good schools out there that are not HYS and will understand you situation.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

sollicitus

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2012, 04:47:40 PM »
Omberon, do you feel that you could have gotten a higher score if you had extra time to take the exam? If the LSAT acts as a gatekeeper like fortook mentioned, this is a pretty important question to consider.

one can always retake.

Duncanjp

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2012, 01:15:24 AM »
Hello everyone,

I have a well documented learning disability that severely impairs my performance on Standardized tests. Would this help my case at schools such at Harvard, Yale and Stanford? I did receive some accommodations when I took LSAT. I did not do that well, but this is expected I guess...I know that law schools do not report LSAT scores that have been accommodated so I wonder would this, along with my learning disability help my chances at getting into Harvard, Yale, and Stanford as a non-traditional student. Also I am a URM.

Severely impairs your performance on standardized tests? I honestly don't mean to be crass here, but how do you expect to pass the bar, the mother of all standardized tests? Even assuming you can get over that hurdle, if Yale were to let you in as a charity case, would you really feel comfortable and welcome there? I don't mean to discourage you, but there's no shame in setting a more realistic bar for yourself. Many law schools with less prestige than HYS are just fine and produce excellent attorneys.

disabilitylaw

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Re: I have a documented Learning disablity
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2012, 02:01:05 PM »
Hi,
I used to work at my law school's Disability Resource Program.
A learning disability will probably not affect a person's ability to do well in law school or take the bar.
If a person has sufficient documentation of said disability, that person will have accommodations in law school - more time to take the exam, a private room, or other accommodations intended to mitigate the impact of the disability.

The bar exam allows for accommodations as well, provided the person has sufficient documentation and applies in a timely fashion.

I don't think having a learning disability, in and of itself, will make a school more inclined to accept a student. There are many learning disabled students in law school.  What schools want are people who are really extraordinary - they want people who will become top-notch lawyers and judges, so they can brag about their prestigious alum. 

Think about what makes you really stand out from the rest of the applicants. Persuade the school that there IS no other "you."
If your learning disability was a significant factor in shaping you as the amazing person you are, then mention it, but don't count on schools believing that a learning disabled student adds diversity.  Disabled students in law school are more common than one might think.