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Concord EJD or JD acceptable Doctorate in order to teach college

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Sacricolist:
Colleges and universities will count the JD (brick and mortar) as a doctoral degree for accreditation and tenure track purposes.  They will grant the JD equivalency for these two issues.  However, if the teaching position requires a doctoral degree the JD is NOT an academic/subject matter substitute.  The doctoral degree expected is usually the PhD.  Sometimes other doctoral degrees are appropriate including the EdD, DBA, DSc, etc.

The JD or other professional doctorates (MD, PsychD, DPT, PharmD, etc.) are usually not considered in the same league unless the person has significant research, career and/or publishing experience.

So when looking to use the JD degree (or any other doctoral degree) to teach in"related fields" it may be darn near impossible to find such a position given the number of people with appropriate credentials in the field who also apply for the same job.

Just my abbreviated two cents.

Maintain FL 350:

--- Quote from: jonlevy on September 04, 2012, 08:21:19 PM ---Actually I have met faculty at a HBCU that had only a JD and also Community College faculty with just a JD, but not an online JD.

--- End quote ---

What is an HBCU? I'm not familiar with the term.


--- Quote from: Sacricolist on September 05, 2012, 10:08:00 AM ---Colleges and universities will count the JD (brick and mortar) as a doctoral degree for accreditation and tenure track purposes.  They will grant the JD equivalency for these two issues.  However, if the teaching position requires a doctoral degree the JD is NOT an academic/subject matter substitute.  The doctoral degree expected is usually the PhD. 

--- End quote ---

Exactly. If someone can obtain a college teaching position with a J.D. only, then the J.D. will suffice for purposes of tenure. However, the chances of actually obtaining a full time, tenure track position (in fields other than law, of course) with only a J.D. is near zero. A J.D./MBA might be able to land a business/business law position, for example, but that's very rare. The traditionally law-related fields, such as poly sci, history, philosophy and econ will almost invariably require a Ph.D.

I live in the LA area, and even the community colleges here have newly minted Ph.Ds teaching intro courses while they look for full time positions. The competition to get hired at the local universities (even the small, non-elite schools) is insane, and I imagine it's similar in all major metropolitan areas. In any case, even if a college was willing to hire a J.D., I don't think an unaccredited J.D. would suffice. There is just too much competition.

jonlevy:
HBCU: Historically black colleges and universities

I agree, JDs are qualified to teach Legal Studies and not much else.  Criminal Justice, Public Law, Poli Sci, History, Public Administration require theoretical and research backgrounds that a JD alone surely does not provide.  Sure some colleges do hire JD's nonetheless if they have other experience but it is not a good practice.  I have seen JDs teaching Homeland Security courses but they usually have relevant exprience.  An EJD on the other hand is a non starter - a vanity degree at best.

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