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Author Topic: Note Taking Services  (Read 251 times)

NonTradLaw

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Note Taking Services
« on: February 05, 2012, 01:53:50 PM »
Has anyone used a note taking service during their 1L year (or beyond)?  E.g., been unable to attend a class w/ prior notice and arranged for someone to sit in on your behalf?  If so, what was the overall outcome? 

Thane Messinger

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Re: Note Taking Services
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2012, 11:41:50 PM »
Has anyone used a note taking service during their 1L year (or beyond)?  E.g., been unable to attend a class w/ prior notice and arranged for someone to sit in on your behalf?  If so, what was the overall outcome?

Yrock -

Interesting.  To fulfill my role as the contrarian, I'll toss out that note-taking is almost entirely a waste of time.  Moreover, it has always been a waste of time--it's only because law school is so different that its uselessness is so serious, and manic note-taking so seductive. 

If you find yourself taking mountains of notes in law school, stop.  It won't help, and it will hurt (in terms of all-important exams) in ways that matter.

If not notes, what then?  The answer is that class is not for learning the law.  [!]  Class is for learning how to use the law you have already taught yourself.  Thus, note-taking becomes rather obviously pointless.  Why take notes on what you already know?

Why do we take notes?  Cause that's what we've always done. 

How do we really get away from this pointless waste of time?  By focusing on (1) the practical application of (2) a limited set of legal rules.  How will we know those rules?  Through the secondary sources (and by staying awake in class).  How will we know that we're getting it?  Through practice exams . . . and through the classroom discussions.  In the classroom we're not writing, or highlighting, or searching for sales on Lingerie R Us.  We're listening *intently* and asking whether we know what the professor will say next.  Once you can effectively predict what the professor is about to say, you've got it.  Why?  Because that's the law.  It's not brain surgery.  The whole point is that it is predictable.

On that predictable note,

Thane.