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Author Topic: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?  (Read 3437 times)

jonlevy

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2012, 09:10:04 PM »
They can sneer behind your back or villify you anonymously but you would still be a licensed attorney the same as they are.

LincolnLover

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2012, 01:47:14 PM »
but how does that differ from having the degree if you don't practice anyways?

They can sneer behind your back or villify you anonymously but you would still be a licensed attorney the same as they are.

GovLaw

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2012, 12:11:35 PM »
I work for state government and have for almost 20 years in.  I have a paralegal and an attorney who report to me, as well as several subject area specialists.  I can tell you from personal experience that the state - here at least -- will research your degree and make sure it is legitimate.  If you won't be acting as an attorney the ABA approval won't be an overwhelming factor, but if the college you attend isn't accredited then it  will be looked upon as a fake degree and you will not even be considered for the position (and could be charged with faking a resume, though we've never done it).  This may seem harsh, but that's just the way it is.  Make absolutely sure of the accreditation of the school by an agency approved by the U.S. Dept. of Education before you start, or you will most likely be wasting your time and money.  YMMV.

LincolnLover

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2012, 01:45:44 PM »
We were discussing an accrediting degree that dosn't sit bar.
The CBE schools tend to have them, Concords is even "regionally accredited" but others life Taft as at least "DETC National accredited"
It would be an accredited graduate just not licensed in this hypo.

I work for state government and have for almost 20 years in.  I have a paralegal and an attorney who report to me, as well as several subject area specialists.  I can tell you from personal experience that the state - here at least -- will research your degree and make sure it is legitimate.  If you won't be acting as an attorney the ABA approval won't be an overwhelming factor, but if the college you attend isn't accredited then it  will be looked upon as a fake degree and you will not even be considered for the position (and could be charged with faking a resume, though we've never done it).  This may seem harsh, but that's just the way it is.  Make absolutely sure of the accreditation of the school by an agency approved by the U.S. Dept. of Education before you start, or you will most likely be wasting your time and money.  YMMV.

jonlevy

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2012, 09:41:17 PM »
DETC is not the same thing as regionally accredited.

JDs are accredited by the ABA or by a state.

If the Concord EJD is actually regionally accredited I would be surprised though I suppose it could be possible.

But unless the intent would be to impersonate an attorney, the Masters in Legal Studies would make more sense.  Non attorneys with a JD after their names make me immediately suspicious since the JD confers no right to practice law or advise.

LincolnLover

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2012, 12:13:32 PM »
Do you think the same of ABA grads that don't practice?
The FBI is full of them, heck Obama is one.

DETC is not the same thing as regionally accredited.

JDs are accredited by the ABA or by a state.

If the Concord EJD is actually regionally accredited I would be surprised though I suppose it could be possible.

But unless the intent would be to impersonate an attorney, the Masters in Legal Studies would make more sense.  Non attorneys with a JD after their names make me immediately suspicious since the JD confers no right to practice law or advise.

LincolnLover

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2012, 12:16:30 PM »
Programmatic accreditations are held with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) and the Council on Social Work Education.


The Teacher Education Program is approved by the West Virginia Department of Education. Concord is a member of the National Association for Business Teacher Education.



The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) is an independent corporation and one of two commission members of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA), which was founded in 1895 as one of six regional institutional accreditors in the United States. The Higher Learning Commission accredits, and thereby grants membership in the Commission and in the North Central Association, degree-granting post-secondary educational institutions in the North Central region.



FalconJimmy

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2012, 06:14:05 PM »
could be charged with faking a resume,

Even though you say you'd never do it, I don't understand how this would be faking a resume.  If a person puts "J.D.  Joe Blow College" on their resume, how is that faking anything, regardless of accreditation?  This, of course, presupposes that the person did actually earn a JD from Joe Blow College.

ipscientific

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2012, 03:08:19 PM »
DETC is not the same thing as regionally accredited.

JDs are accredited by the ABA or by a state.

If the Concord EJD is actually regionally accredited I would be surprised though I suppose it could be possible.

But unless the intent would be to impersonate an attorney, the Masters in Legal Studies would make more sense.  Non attorneys with a JD after their names make me immediately suspicious since the JD confers no right to practice law or advise.


DETC is recognized by the US Department of Education. It's supposed to be that if a college is accredited by an organization that the US Department of Education recognizes, it's valid and official. Suppose to be. A lot of hype out there and different views.

But I don't know why someone would want a JD and not practice law. It doesn't make any sense to me. If you go that far and get a JD why not just take the bar. That's like me going all the way through medical school and not wanting to be a Doctor at the end.

LincolnLover

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Re: Is getting a law degree worth it if you work in a government agency?
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2012, 05:23:52 PM »
It dosn't have to make sense. Lots of people do it an ABA schools all the time.
MD not as much. Different worlds, different people.

A lot of people go to law school after a coin toss between it an MBA, and often don't really need either.


Other examples include people who want to be politicians, climb up in corporations, etc.

Ask yourself this to help it make more sense: Why would anyone bother with a joint JD/MBA if people only wanted the minimum? More on point to the question you asked why bother to get a joint JD/MD (many do) afterall you are not going to be doing both with that degree.
Yet, life goes on.