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Author Topic: Limited Licenses  (Read 3760 times)

fortook

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Re: Limited Licenses
« Reply #30 on: April 11, 2012, 12:04:29 PM »
Break down (not the Dutch movie)- Go to law school- practice law in U.S.A.-50 states + territories and D.C. in U.S.A.- Cali a state in U.S.A. (don't go saying I'm wrong cuz they a Republic- its not the point) - practice in Cali = practice in U.S.A- U.S.A. is somewhere = practice in Cali = practice in U.S.A. = practice somewhere.

You're getting defensive because you think I'm attacking online schools?

Thank you for telling me what my part is. Without you I would be lost.  Now I can relax.  We should kiss.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

jonlevy

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Re: Limited Licenses
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2012, 09:26:31 PM »
Washington state has a Limited Practice Officer program.

Yes Limited Practice Officer, that is what the other 49 states call an Escrow Officer but it is not a law license.

jonlevy

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Re: Limited Licenses
« Reply #32 on: April 17, 2012, 09:30:55 PM »
The correct term is Pro Hac Vice.  The original poster had some delusional idea they could be a lawyer without passing the bar, I believe they were not a Distance Learning Grad but a non ABA law school grad whose Kentucky law school went under without getting accreditation leaving them unable to take the bar in any state.



The only limited license I know of is typically between neighboring states.  You can apply to practice in a state you are not licensed in on a case by case basis.  Oddly, many neighboring states don't have reciprocity and an attorney may have cross over responsibilities. Hence the need for a limited license.

Of course, you must pass a bar in your own state and cannot abuse it.  All this tax and immigration stuff referenced isn't relevant.  Its a bar licensing thing, not a specialty thing.  It can also be granted to a law student to practice under supervision, typically at DA or PD offices. 

You should be taught this in law school, not trying to be arrogant or rude, but shi.t people this is day one. Do online schools not teach this?  That's kind of scary.

woodkeys

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Limited Licenses
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2012, 04:29:56 AM »
1. After working in the mortgage business for many years (10+), I worked for an escrow company in King County Washington for almost 2 years, then took the exam to be a Limited Practice Officer.

2.After having so much finance, accounting and tax experience, I took the Enrolled Agent exam; which allows me to appear in IRS Tax court on behalf of clients.

4. After all these combined year of experience, I am taking the exam this January to become a CMA--Certified Management Acocuntant.

In my business now, I focus on real estate tax and finance; focusing primarily on commercial transactions and closings, and also business financial and tax consulting. Not sure if I will go to law school or not.

cooley3L

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Re: Limited Licenses
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2012, 12:25:54 PM »
1. After working in the mortgage business for many years (10+), I worked for an escrow company in King County Washington for almost 2 years, then took the exam to be a Limited Practice Officer.

2.After having so much finance, accounting and tax experience, I took the Enrolled Agent exam; which allows me to appear in IRS Tax court on behalf of clients.

4. After all these combined year of experience, I am taking the exam this January to become a CMA--Certified Management Acocuntant.

In my business now, I focus on real estate tax and finance; focusing primarily on commercial transactions and closings, and also business financial and tax consulting. Not sure if I will go to law school or not.
There are real estate attorneys, but it dosn't sound like you need it to do your job. You may want to look more into the requirments in your state to be a CPA/Bankruptcy Trustee. Those might be more applicable to your job, and have a lot less training involved.