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Author Topic: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree  (Read 6434 times)

jonlevy

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #40 on: January 18, 2012, 11:26:52 PM »
If you wait 5 years, Maryland will let you take the bar without a waiver.  DC will let you motion in after 5 years as well.  But somehow I think they have non ABA schools that are not DL in mind with that waiver. But no harm trying once you pass the bar.

ipscientific

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #41 on: January 18, 2012, 11:42:01 PM »
If you wait 5 years, Maryland will let you take the bar without a waiver.  DC will let you motion in after 5 years as well.  But somehow I think they have non ABA schools that are not DL in mind with that waiver. But no harm trying once you pass the bar.

Thanks for the info. Non ABA is a Non ABA and this is all so stupid.

GovLaw

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #42 on: January 19, 2012, 10:19:07 AM »
This is one topic that has absolutely been beat to death....

LincolnLover

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #43 on: January 19, 2012, 02:42:19 PM »
alright, I'll bite ont this......

1) How do you plan to "present it right" (do you have a speach prepared)
2) Have you researched to see if anyone else has applied in your state for a DETC non-aba approval in the past? Were they approved or denied? Did you read the dicta in those cases? What reasons did they give for the approval or denial in those cases? If denied, how is yours more unique than theirs to merit it more than theirs did?

Waivers still must meet qualifications to be approved as waivers. You can't apply for a waiver to whatever you want and just "present it the right way". You can't just "try hard enough" and turn water into wine.

No one is trying to apply for a waiver to whatever they want. The waiver applied for would be to sit for another states bar exam. This is the waiver for graduates of Non ABA Law Schools for Maryland. http://www.courts.state.md.us/ble/pdfs/waiver_rule.pdf    Let's keep in mind that this person has already passed the CA bar.

The whole point of applying for a waiver is presenting it the right way. Your not turning water into wine. You are using your JD that you earned from an accredited law school, your documentation of your study of the law for 4 years, your undergraduate and graduate degrees, work experience, and the passing of the CA bar to another state to take the bar of another. More like moving wine from one state to another.

Do you not think a US born citizen that has put this much work into becoming an attorney should be eligible to take the bar exam in another state if they passed the bar of another? The states formed a union long ago and it is called the United States of America. I believe that the American Dream is still alive in a lot of us.

LincolnLover

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #44 on: January 19, 2012, 02:46:12 PM »
how is it stupid? Sounds like he gave the textbook description of what to do. Courts will look  to that as well. My guess is any waivors they approve will be for people who are licensed in another state already with experience trying to prove their degree is "equal" to an ABA degree when you factor that in.

For the record not all non-aba is the same either. A physical campus goes a long way to proving it's closeness to ABA, especially if the school is trying to meet ABA standards. Most license boards also look higher on Regional Accrediting than National Accrediting too. (just a fact of life)

Oh and "that's stupid"  tends not to count as a winning argument in most cases.

If you wait 5 years, Maryland will let you take the bar without a waiver.  DC will let you motion in after 5 years as well.  But somehow I think they have non ABA schools that are not DL in mind with that waiver. But no harm trying once you pass the bar.

Thanks for the info. Non ABA is a Non ABA and this is all so stupid.

ipscientific

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #45 on: January 19, 2012, 11:12:06 PM »
how is it stupid? Sounds like he gave the textbook description of what to do. Courts will look  to that as well. My guess is any waivors they approve will be for people who are licensed in another state already with experience trying to prove their degree is "equal" to an ABA degree when you factor that in.

For the record not all non-aba is the same either. A physical campus goes a long way to proving it's closeness to ABA, especially if the school is trying to meet ABA standards. Most license boards also look higher on Regional Accrediting than National Accrediting too. (just a fact of life)

Oh and "that's stupid"  tends not to count as a winning argument in most cases.

If you wait 5 years, Maryland will let you take the bar without a waiver.  DC will let you motion in after 5 years as well.  But somehow I think they have non ABA schools that are not DL in mind with that waiver. But no harm trying once you pass the bar.

Thanks for the info. Non ABA is a Non ABA and this is all so stupid.

jonlevy is resourceful and obviously very intelligent. I am aware of this. Thank you Mr. Levy.

lincolnlover, If you don't know what stupid means I don't know what to tell you. But I have sh*t to do. Do you really expect me to dig deep in my mind to answer this? Do you even go to law school? I hope you do not spend your life analyzing non aba law schools and their sub categories. What are there 12 of them in the country? Cmon man.









ipscientific

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #46 on: January 19, 2012, 11:33:40 PM »
alright, I'll bite ont this......

1) How do you plan to "present it right" (do you have a speach prepared)
2) Have you researched to see if anyone else has applied in your state for a DETC non-aba approval in the past? Were they approved or denied? Did you read the dicta in those cases? What reasons did they give for the approval or denial in those cases? If denied, how is yours more unique than theirs to merit it more than theirs did?

Waivers still must meet qualifications to be approved as waivers. You can't apply for a waiver to whatever you want and just "present it the right way". You can't just "try hard enough" and turn water into wine.

No one is trying to apply for a waiver to whatever they want. The waiver applied for would be to sit for another states bar exam. This is the waiver for graduates of Non ABA Law Schools for Maryland. http://www.courts.state.md.us/ble/pdfs/waiver_rule.pdf    Let's keep in mind that this person has already passed the CA bar.

The whole point of applying for a waiver is presenting it the right way. Your not turning water into wine. You are using your JD that you earned from an accredited law school, your documentation of your study of the law for 4 years, your undergraduate and graduate degrees, work experience, and the passing of the CA bar to another state to take the bar of another. More like moving wine from one state to another.

Do you not think a US born citizen that has put this much work into becoming an attorney should be eligible to take the bar exam in another state if they passed the bar of another? The states formed a union long ago and it is called the United States of America. I believe that the American Dream is still alive in a lot of us.


1) How do you plan to "present it right" (do you have a speach prepared)

Thanks for biting on this. Presenting it right is sending in what they ask for in my state which is Maryland. Feel free to examine it and check for errors. www.courts.state.md.us/ble/pdfs/waiver_rule.pdf

I just started law school. I have a long way to go before I go for the waiver. I still have to pass the baby bar.


2) Have you researched to see if anyone else has applied in your state for a DETC non-aba approval in the past? Were they approved or denied? Did you read the dicta in those cases? What reasons did they give for the approval or denial in those cases? If denied, how is yours more unique than theirs to merit it more than theirs did?

No, not yet. I have about 3 and a half years until I'll be ready. I'll let you know then. I'm sure you will still be on this board talking about pass rates of Non ABA graduates then.

Thank God I have a life!





LincolnLover

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #47 on: January 21, 2012, 06:21:12 PM »
Your responces say all that needs be said on the topic brother. Hope the best for you, but I really don't think you know how the legal system works at all.

For starters you better find "the time" to research a topic before making a case that you hope to win.
Good luck.

LincolnLover

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #48 on: January 21, 2012, 06:26:25 PM »
Thanks for the link. Here is what is says (you either didn't read it or don't understand what it means)

Two key points 1)A  JD (or its equivelent) from an ABA approved school (not or something equal to the ABA)

 2) The "waiver" is for if you have already been practicing and in good standing in another state.

If you practice in CA for a few years first, you can probably win your case. If not, you don't even qualify to apply. Sorry but you have to qualify for a waiver to apply for it.

Waiver for Graduates of Non-ABA Law Schools
The Standard Educational Requirement: A candidate is eligible to take the Maryland Bar
examination only if he or she has completed the pre-legal education necessary to meet the minimum
requirements for admission to an American Bar Association (ABA) approved law school and has
earned the juris doctor (or its equivalent) from a law school approved by the ABA. (See Bar
Admission Rules 3 and 4 and the Annotated Code of Maryland, Business Occupations and
Professions, Section 10-207 (d).)
Waiver of the Standard Educational Requirement: The State Board of Law Examiners
has the discretion to waive the standard educational requirement for any person who (1) has passed
the bar examination of another state and is a member in good standing of the Bar of that state and
(2) in the Board’s opinion is qualified by reason of education, experience, or both to take the bar
examination. (See Bar Admission Rule 4(b).)
Procedure to Petition for a Waiver
A Petition for a Waiver should be in the form of a letter sent to the administrative office of
the State Board of Law Examiners accompanied by the following documents (Photocopies of
documents in your possession are not acceptable. You must contact the proper official and request
documents authenticated with appropriate seals.):
1. A letter of verification from the proper authority that you have taken and passed the Bar
examination in that state (a photocopy is permissible in this case),
2. A current certificate of admission to the Bar of another state from the highest court of that
state and a current certificate of good standing issued by the appropriate authority in the state (in
many states the certificate of admission and the certificate of good standing are combined in a single
document),
3. A detailed description of your pre-legal education indicating the college or university
attended, the date of graduation, and the degree obtained; include an official transcript reflecting all
of the subjects taken and the number of semester hours of credit earned,
4. The name and location of the law school attended, the date of your law school graduation,
and verification of your degree in the form of an official transcript of your law school education,
5. A detailed description of any experience you have in the practice of law.
All supporting documents must accompany your petition for a waiver: Your waiver
request will be denied if you fail to submit all required documentation (described above) with your
petition for a waiver.
Transcripts: If your college or the law school has a policy of not releasing official
transcripts to students, you should request that the college or law school send the transcripts directly
to this office. Advise this office in writing that your transcripts will be sent directly to this office by
the college or law school.
Deadlines for Waiver Requests: The State Board of Law Examiners must have adequate
time to review and consider your credentials.
In order for a waiver request to be considered and acted upon for the bar examination
to be held in February, the request for a waiver and all documentation must be received in this
office no later than the preceding November 20th.
For the July examination, the waiver request and all documentation must be received
in this office no later than the preceding April 20th.
The waiver request and accompanying documents should be sent to:
STATE BOARD OF LAW EXAMINERS
2011-F Commerce Park Drive
Annapolis, MD 21401
If you have questions, please call (410) 260-3640.
Notification of Waiver Approval: When your file is complete, the State Board of Law
Examiners will review it. After a review of the documentation accompanying your request, the
State Board of Law Examiners will make its determination and notify you whether you qualify
for a waiver. If the Board grants the waiver, the appropriate application forms will be mailed to
you with the Board’s decision.

jonlevy

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Re: Where can you get admitted with California DL degree
« Reply #49 on: January 22, 2012, 09:17:46 AM »
"you either didn't read it or don't understand what it means"

In all fairness, statutes and rules, are hard to read and undertsand even if you have practiced law for many years.

One of the good things about DL study is that you can focus on important things for the Bar like memorizing the UCC and some of the key Restatement sections.
Being able to regurgitate that stuff on command when appropriate will impress whoever is grading your exam far more than eloquent arguments based on fact not law.