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Author Topic: PETITIONING THE SUPREME COURT IN MICHIGAN TO TAKE BAR EXAM..IS IT HARD TO DO?  (Read 1721 times)

susanblaw

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Hello!

a friend of mine just called and said she was in a similar situation and she lives in Michigan. She said she is going to petition the Supreme Court there and was going to try to take the exam. She has no money to restart her law degree and made good grades in college and law school even though it wasnt ABA.

Does anyone know anything about petitioning the courts in a particular state to take the exam? is it hard? what kind of information do they look for?

Any advice would help!

jonlevy

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Petitioning is the way to go, the Bar Examiners are usually unhelpful.

susanblaw

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any advice on what to include? or what they mainly look at? has anyone petitioned and been approved?

any and all advice would help! thanks!

jonlevy

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Do a case law search.

GovLaw

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In Kentucky you could consider having your education evaluated by the Kentucky Board of Bar Examiners for equivalency to a 3-year ABA education under SCR 2.014(2).  There is a requirement that you’ve actually practiced law, so this is a long shot – but it appears to be the only possibility here.

susanblaw

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Oh I am not talking about KY. I am talking about Michigan.

Any advice on what the bar examiners look for when petitioning to take the bar in their state?

susanblaw

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this is the advice they gave my friend....any advice? or has anyone done something like this before?

In order for the Board to evaluate whether it should grant a waiver, the Board requires individuals seeking a waiver to provide certain information.  The Board uses this information in evaluating whether the individual may take the bar examination. The following must be provided:
 
-College and law school transcripts (translated to English if necessary).
-A detailed description of your legal education and training.  This must include a syllabus from each of the courses taken, a list of the textbooks used, the attendance requirements at the time you matriculated, and the number of credit hours required for graduation.
-Descriptions of academic and professional records of all faculty and executive administrators of each law school attended.
-Copies of all material being sent to applicants by each law school attended, including the school catalog, class schedules, and course descriptions.
-Bar examination results, i.e., percent passed/failed, of graduates of each law school attended, classified by state administering the exam, for the previous three years.
-A statement of whether you have applied to take the bar exam in any other jurisdiction and the result of that request, and the result of any bar examination taken by you.
-A description of your work history.
-Evidence of experience in the full-time practice of law.  Such evidence should include, but is not be limited to, a sworn affidavit detailing the nature and extent of your legal work experience during the time you claim to have engaged in the full-time practice of law; legal memoranda prepared by you; copies of published cases resulting from pleadings and papers filed by you in your capacity as an attorney; and/or letters of reference from the bench and bar in the jurisdiction in which you have been engaged in the practice of law.
-If you have a law degree from a non-U.S. jurisdiction, a description of that country’s legal system, including, but not limited to, whether the English common law substantially forms the basis of that country’s jurisprudence and whether English is the language of instruction and practice in the courts of that jurisdiction.
-A narrative statement as to why you feel that good cause by clear and convincing evidence has been established.
-Include any other documentation, material, or information you feel is relevant to the establishment of good cause.
-If you cannot obtain any of the above information, state the efforts you undertook to obtain it.
-The Board may request additional evidence as it deems appropriate.
 

jonlevy

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I could be wrong but this process looks like it is geared towards attorneys who have a non ABA degree and are already licensed in a US or foreign jurisdiction.

Evidence of experience in the full-time practice of law.  Such evidence should include, but is not be limited to, a sworn affidavit detailing the nature and extent of your legal work experience during the time you claim to have engaged in the full-time practice of law; legal memoranda prepared by you; copies of published cases resulting from pleadings and papers filed by you in your capacity as an attorney; and/or letters of reference from the bench and bar in the jurisdiction in which you have been engaged in the practice of law

passaroa25

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Write the Concord graduate who petitioned  Massachusetts to take its bar exam.  Ask him how he went about petitioning that state's bar exam.  I posted the court opinion on this forum around October of last year.  Even though it is a different state, the procedure may be similar.
Angie

jonlevy

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I believe the Concord grad had already passed the Cal bar.