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Author Topic: are there any states that will let you to take the bar exam from a non aba sch?  (Read 9331 times)

jonlevy

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It obviously wasn't state approved, it opened contingent upon ABA approval. Kentucky does not recognize non ABA JDs unless one has already been admitted in another jurisdiction.

www.kyoba.org/rules/scr_2.014.pdf

The legal research skills evident on this board are just plain pitiful. You all get an "F" on basic Google research.


LincolnLover

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Wrong, this is what is says:

1) Every applicant for admission to the Kentucky Bar must have completed degree requirements for a J.D. or equivalent professional degree from a law school approved by the American Bar Association or by the Association of American Law Schools.

Notice the "or equivelent". The ABA requires the school to exists prior to accrediting. Lots of states (TN comes to mind as an often unmentioned example) have state approved (non-aba) lawschools. Where did you get the presumption for your statements? Clearly not from the link your provided with your post.

It obviously wasn't state approved, it opened contingent upon ABA approval. Kentucky does not recognize non ABA JDs unless one has already been admitted in another jurisdiction.

www.kyoba.org/rules/scr_2.014.pdf

The legal research skills evident on this board are just plain pitiful. You all get an "F" on basic Google research.

LincolnLover

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Heck even Dartmouth has one.......


University of Massachusetts School of Law---Dartmouth
Students interested in attending the non-ABA-approved law school at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth can apply via the school's website. You will need your LSAT score, two letters of recommendation and a personal statement. While currently not approved by the American Bar Association, the law program at the University of Massachusetts, formerly the Southern New England School of Law, is approved by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

University of Massachusetts School of Law---Dartmouth
333 Faunce Corner Road
North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747
508-998-9600
law.umassd.edu



Read more: Non-ABA Approved Law Schools | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6524023_non_aba-approved-law-schools.html#ixzz1j53BYUHI


jonlevy

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No I am correct and you cannot read or apply statutes.

"1) Every applicant for admission to the Kentucky Bar must have completed degree requirements for a J.D. or equivalent professional degree from a law school approved by the American Bar Association or by the Association of American Law Schools.

AAL Schools is this list, I think they are also all ABA accredited:

http://www.aals.org/about_memberschools.php

An equivalent professional degree from an ABA or AALS university would be what - maybe a LLM in comparative common law for foreign law degree holder.

As for other states, we were talking about Kentucky not Massachusetts, Tennessee, Alabama, or California which do have their own acceditation schemes. Do not assume because one state recognizes their own schools that others do.

jonlevy

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So does anyone have any constructive advice or just more rank speculation?  I stand by the suggestion, they should look into getting the 26 ABA credits and take the DC bar. No one is going to honor a non ABA degree from Kentucky when Kentucky does not recognize the degree.

FalconJimmy

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So does anyone have any constructive advice or just more rank speculation?  I stand by the suggestion, they should look into getting the 26 ABA credits and take the DC bar. No one is going to honor a non ABA degree from Kentucky when Kentucky does not recognize the degree.

I think you've covered it quite well.  The only other thing I see working is using the education to try and study under a judge or attorney in a state that allows it.  I honestly don't see any other practical ways of accomplishing this.

LincolnLover

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So, you repeat what I just said and claim it somehow is different? As for the other states, examples of how otherstates apply simular wording. You are making a lot of assumptions.

No I am correct and you cannot read or apply statutes.

"1) Every applicant for admission to the Kentucky Bar must have completed degree requirements for a J.D. or equivalent professional degree from a law school approved by the American Bar Association or by the Association of American Law Schools.

AAL Schools is this list, I think they are also all ABA accredited:

http://www.aals.org/about_memberschools.php

An equivalent professional degree from an ABA or AALS university would be what - maybe a LLM in comparative common law for foreign law degree holder.

As for other states, we were talking about Kentucky not Massachusetts, Tennessee, Alabama, or California which do have their own acceditation schemes. Do not assume because one state recognizes their own schools that others do.

jonlevy

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LL - what do you think the equivalent of a ABA JD degree is - it is a LLB or LLM from an an accredited school.  There is no state accreditation scheme in Kentucky. LLBs are no longer awarded in the US but might have been when the rule was originally promulgated. From the point of most state bars non ABA degrees are of so little consequence they are a mere after thought in the rules.


LincolnLover

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And yet the state allowed the "lawschool" to operate in their state.

Look, I can tell no one here (not even its "graduate") has the ability to do so, so I did the craziest thing known to man........I asked the only people whose opion matters at all(the state bar) I will let you know what they tell me. How's that sound?

LL - what do you think the equivalent of a ABA JD degree is - it is a LLB or LLM from an an accredited school.  There is no state accreditation scheme in Kentucky. LLBs are no longer awarded in the US but might have been when the rule was originally promulgated. From the point of most state bars non ABA degrees are of so little consequence they are a mere after thought in the rules.

jonlevy

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I will wait for you tell me what I already know - Kentucky does not accredit law schools. If Barkley had obtained ABA approval, Barkley's students could have taken the KY bar.

By the way don't call the state bar, it is the KYBOA you want, here's the numbers:

http://www.kyoba.org/contacts.htm