Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: are there any states that will let you to take the bar exam from a non aba sch?  (Read 9180 times)

susanblaw

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
    • Email
hello!

I graduated from KY who was in the process of getting ABA approved. Is there any state that will allow me to take the bar exam in their state? i tried California but they said the non aba school had to be from their own state.

please help me..even if i have to take the baby bar i will do it in any state. i spent so much money for 3 years i would hate for it to go waste.

extremely lostt

FalconJimmy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
    • Email
i spent so much money for 3 years i would hate for it to go waste.

First, not to kick you while you're down, but you're only thinking about this, now?

I feel bad that you got suckered into the "We're pursuing accreditation" scam.  In all seriousness, most schools that say "we're pursuing accreditation" are not actually pursuing anything.  What "pursuing accreditation" means is "not accredited".  Nothing more.  Nothing less.  It's just that "pursuing accreditation" sounds so much better than, "we can't meet basic minimal standards".  They know darned well that when they say they're "pursuing accreditation" that hopeful students think, "Oh, so they'll probably be accredited before I graduate".  Trouble is, generally, they aren't really trying that hard to pursue accreditation.  It's not like accreditation standards are secret.  They know if they meet them or not.  However, once in a while, they re-submit an application and are rejected and that allows them to maintain the illusion of trying.

At this point, I don't mean to be harsh, but your degree, as a credential in the law, doesn't appear to be of any value at all.  I can only hope that the things you learned while getting that degree are worth it.  It may be valuable to you if you pursue non-law related work.  You can, truthfully, claim that you hold a JD.  Lots of folks in all walks of life work in various fields with a JD and they are not attorneys.  So, you have a somewhat impressive graduate degree that you can put on a resume. 

If you are intent on practicing the law, one option is to live in one of the states that will allow you to sit for the bar without going to law school.  Usually to do this, you have to study under an attorney or judge for a few years.  Your JD may be of some value.  I would hope it is, at a minimum, viewed as being on par or perhaps superior to a parallegal degree.  Who knows.  This might let you work for a few years under an attorney as either a legal secretary or parallegal and complete your study requirements that way, allowing you to sit for the bar.

If you're not leaving KY, you're pretty much stuck, though.  I do notice that KY allows you to sit for the bar exam if your school is accredited by the Association of American Law Schools.  So, if that describes your school, you should be good to go.

http://www.kyoba.org/rules/scr_2.014.pdf

Another option is to simply enroll in an ABA accredited law school.

I wish I had been around to advise you when you were contemplating going to a non-accredited school.  I think some folks here think I'm overly harsh about them, but I fear that some people, like you, don't fully realize what they're getting into.

susanblaw

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
    • Email
i understand what your saying but are there any states that will allow me to sit for the bar or even baby bar? all i need is 1 state.

GovLaw

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 52
    • View Profile
    • Email
I could be mistaken, but I believe there are only three law schools in Kentucky - UK College of Law, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville, and the Salmon P. Chase College of Law of Northern Kentucky University.  All three are ABA accredited and have been for years.  I'm at a loss as to what KY law school you could have graduated from, would you care to identify the school?

susanblaw

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
    • Email
i went to Barkley school of Law..they filed bankruptcy...the last i heard....

i just need 1 state that will allow me to take the bar exam from a non accredited school

LincolnLover

  • Guest
If you need "just one" state, why not the state that the school was located in? Seems like the best bet to me. Wasn't it at least state bar approved? If not, how was it legal to even exist in the first place?

i went to Barkley school of Law..they filed bankruptcy...the last i heard....

i just need 1 state that will allow me to take the bar exam from a non accredited school

jonlevy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 574
    • View Profile
    • Email
Barkley closed in 2008.  Do you have a diploma? 

If so, I may have solution for you.

jonlevy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 574
    • View Profile
    • Email
Usually to do this, you have to study under an attorney or judge for a few years.

Actually never seen anyone get a license this way, who would want to be a slave to a judge or a lawyer for years, yuck!

GovLaw

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 52
    • View Profile
    • Email
Well, at least official transcripts are still available if that will help you.  In December 2008, Southern Illinois University School of Law accepted the responsibility as the custodians for the student academic records from the Barkley School of Law (formerly the American Justice School of Law).  They will provide your academic records directly to you (as a former student) and bar admission committees.   It appears that Barkley never even had provisional approval, so finding somewhere to take the bar may be difficult.

However, there may be some good news for you from the Attorney General’s Office; it appears that your outstanding loan amounts for attending this school may be reduced.  Information is available here:  http://migration.kentucky.gov/newsroom/ag/slxagreement.htm

After doing some research, and placing a few phone calls, it appears that you could consider having your education evaluated by the Kentucky Board of Bar Examiners for equivalency to a 3-year ABA education under SCR 2.014(2).  There is a requirement that you’ve actually practiced law, so this is a long shot – but it appears to be the only possibility in Kentucky.

Opie58

  • Guest
Usually to do this, you have to study under an attorney or judge for a few years.

Actually never seen anyone get a license this way, who would want to be a slave to a judge or a lawyer for years, yuck!

Washington State allows a Law Clerk Program through the state bar.  The clerk program is a four year program where you study under the mentoring of a lawyer or judge.  There are a handful of folks who have done it this way - not many.  http://www.wsba.org/Licensing-and-Lawyer-Conduct/Admissions/Limited-Licenses-and-Special-Programs/Non-Lawyers-and-Students/Law-Clerk-Program