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Author Topic: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter  (Read 3963 times)

MiaTang

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Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« on: January 04, 2012, 02:39:03 AM »
I am entering college in 2012 fall and long to become a law school student for graduate school. I am planning to major in International Relations or Political Science in a women's college (admission results are coming out in March), such as Mount Holyoke, Smith or Bryn Mawr College.

I know it is definitely too early for me to do legitimate LSAT prep, but I want to know what type of course I should choose to benefit my college education in preparation for law school and the LSAT test? Or, anyone has good advice for starters?? Thanks!! 

Jeffort

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2012, 05:30:13 AM »
Certainly do not start working LSAT materials for a few years.  Your main academic priority should be earning and maintaining a high GPA.

For law school admissions your undergraduate major does not really matter unless it is something really easy and non-academic along the lines of arts and crafts, horticulture, pottery, etc., but your GPA does matter a lot.  Do not select your UG major and classes based on what you think law school admission committees might favor. They seek to put together classes of people from diverse backgrounds that have performed well in prior academic settings.

Pick a major that you are interested in.  You should explore the options to find the one that is the best fit for you.

Regarding specific undergraduate classes that may help you be better prepared for the LSAT several years from now when you take it, basic statistics classes and basic logic/philosophy (NOT symbolic logic!) classes would help.  Those classes teach the fundamentals of valid methods of logical and analytical reasoning and the many common flawed methods of reasoning that are the bread and butter of what many LSAT questions (especially in the LR sections) revolve around. 

LSAT questions are designed to test reasoning skills/abilities with fairly basic logical concepts as well as English reading comprehension/grammar/vocabulary skills. 


IClawstud

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2012, 08:51:14 PM »
concurring: I would definitely make sure you take classes you enjoy and are easy for you. You seem like a conscientious person and when you need to get the LSATs taken care of you will. (Probably starting spring semester of Junior year.) In the mean time I suggest taking classes in your first year and a half that you can pull strong grades in to get acclimated to college. Than take some academically challenging classes which you find enjoyable as well.

MissMelissRoths03

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 02:56:44 PM »
I agree. Many students make the mistake of stressing about the LSAT before they should. Focus on your GPA and involvement on campus. Start preparing the summer before or fall of your junior year at the earliest.

Julie Fern

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2012, 05:10:02 PM »
yes. stress about any republican as president instead.

fortook

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2012, 04:20:21 PM »
Check out Law School Undercover:  The author purports to be an ex law school admission person.  He/she argues for Econ, for a variety of reasons.

I know Econ and Math majors perform best statistically on the LSAT, and ironically prelaw people are among the worst performers.  When I was in undergrad my college's valedictorian was a double major in Math and History and was being specifically groomed for law school.  I don't know where she ended up going, but I'd bet it was a top 14.

This isn't and ad, btw, I don't work for the publisher or anything.  I wish I had asked your question when I was in undergrad.  Good luck.

P.S.- there won't be a repub president.  Their present bests are pretty bad.  Newt? Really? Do they remember that guy?
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

SaraJean

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2012, 10:52:21 AM »
I know it is definitely too early for me to do legitimate LSAT prep, but I want to know what type of course I should choose to benefit my college education in preparation for law school and the LSAT test? Or, anyone has good advice for starters?? Thanks!!
Classes in logic would be helpful, and some undergrad institutions allow students to take them to fulfill a math requirement.  I liked math, so I took the math classes.  My LSAT prep books were my introduction to formal logic.

fortook

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2012, 11:39:29 PM »
^^^ An ad.  An ad for useless crap, no less.  If you can't use a watch to keep time, you have bigger problems than a looming LSAT. 20 bucks for a fancy timer- utter insanity.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

Jhuen_the_bird

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2012, 12:25:32 PM »
I'm a 2010 law school grad and currently a lawyer.  I would advise you major in something more useful like business/Economics or science or engineering.  This will give you an edge on the job market after law school ... The job market for lawyers is currently dismal.  I'm a very optimistic person, and even I can admit that.  It doesn't look like its getting better, so you shouldn't count on that (but it would be awesome if things improved!)   Also, if you have an engineering or hard science background, you can do patent law / ip which is in higher demand.

I'd recommend minoring in English or philosophy (or just taking courses) to get the edge for writing / reading and the LSAT.  Also, a foreign language, especially Chinese could be helpful.


Oh and also... Make sure it's your dream to be a lawyer and not a law student.  While I enjoyed law school, 3 years is fleeting, and then you have to be a lawyer ... Which is often really different than what ppl think it is.  Also, do research on the law school scam and the state of the legal economy so you know what you're getting into.  And know that document review jobs are what new lawyers today are fighting for in ost places, as sad as that may seem.

Jeffort

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Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2012, 03:54:04 PM »
I'm a 2010 law school grad and currently a lawyer.  I would advise you major in something more useful like business/Economics or science or engineering.  This will give you an edge on the job market after law school ... The job market for lawyers is currently dismal.  I'm a very optimistic person, and even I can admit that.  It doesn't look like its getting better, so you shouldn't count on that (but it would be awesome if things improved!)   Also, if you have an engineering or hard science background, you can do patent law / ip which is in higher demand.

I'd recommend minoring in English or philosophy (or just taking courses) to get the edge for writing / reading and the LSAT.  Also, a foreign language, especially Chinese could be helpful.


Oh and also... Make sure it's your dream to be a lawyer and not a law student.  While I enjoyed law school, 3 years is fleeting, and then you have to be a lawyer ... Which is often really different than what ppl think it is.  Also, do research on the law school scam and the state of the legal economy so you know what you're getting into.  And know that document review jobs are what new lawyers today are fighting for in ost places, as sad as that may seem.



I pretty much agree with almost all of it since it's good realistic advice that matches up with the current state of affairs.

The part I must caution about is choosing a hard science major such as engineering, chemistry, biology bio-tech, etc. if one is not really interested in the field and willing to put in a lot of hard work in the associated classes. 

The classes are tough and very demanding.  They will rip apart your GPA and sink your brain as fast as Seal Team Six pulled Osama Bin Ladens brain out the back of his head and sank him in the ocean if you are not interested in the classes and consequently don't do the homework because you hate the classes/subjects and homework load involved.

If you are into hard sciences/engineering/bio-tech/etc., it is a great way to set a path to become a patent lawyer or a lawyer that deals with patent and science issues related litigation.  There is still a steady demand for lawyers of that type that are armed with specialized knowledge.

Also, don't do a drama major or some other similar --free/easy A's for everyone-- not very academic/very little reading involved major of the type that are meant for people who want to be actors/artists/musicians/famous entertainers/etc.  Law school admission committees at good schools will likely just laugh a bit when they read the application and then put it in the denied stack unless you have a top notch LSAT score, GPA and compelling soft factors that show you can and will be a book worm that is cool with spending a lot of time reading and writing.