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Author Topic: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?  (Read 907 times)

collegebum1989

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Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« on: December 26, 2011, 10:58:54 PM »
Hi everyone,

I've decided to apply to law school next cycle (2013 incoming class) after I complete my masters in BME this upcoming spring. I want to study patent law in law school and hopefully become a patent attorney within the biotech industry.

Problem is, that I have to have a year in between due to the application process, I will be applying for multiple things next year. But which one would you think would be best for my career (both in law school and afterwards):

A. 1-year Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Fellowship to conduct research in an international country
B. Full-time job within the biotechnology industry
C. Academic research at my current university (leading to a publication)
D. Non-paid internship at the United States Patent Office
E. Non-paid/Paid internship at Patent Law firm
F. Study for and take the Patent Bar

Thank you for all the help!

FalconJimmy

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2011, 05:39:44 PM »
F., as well as completing a 0L study program in anticipation for your 1L year.  You can find out more about what you can study in books like Planet Law School and Getting In, Getting Good, Getting the Gold, etc. 

iracafella

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2011, 07:56:40 PM »
I would say: don't do the full time job, and don't do any unpaid thing. I like your A answer, but I think the academic research option may give enough free time to focus on the LSAT. Have you taken the LSAT? I think the most important thing isn't some notch on your resume (in your 20s), I think it is just getting a GREAT LSAT score, so that you are a BA, and a MBE, holder, AND you have a bomb LSAT score.  I think that would matter waaaaay more than any of those things you said. But because it sounds like you have to pick one, I would say A or the research one - but whichever is best for your LSAT. Go for 165+ !!!! :D

collegebum1989

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2011, 09:24:18 PM »
I agree with you guys about the importance on the LSAT. I am actually planning to take the LSAT in June 2012, and already created a study schedule to accomplish this by that time frame. I plan on retaking them in September if I am not satisfied with my score.

The only reason I was considering the full-time job is maybe to relieve some of the debt I've incurred due to graduate school. Also, I was thinking that if I had a full-time job, I can focus on starting my career at a company in the unfortunate event I don't get into any law schools.

The research route is definitely compelling, and I know that nothing I do in the next year will affect my law school admissions, but how about employment after law school? Or will it be negligible based on how I perform in law school.


collegebum1989

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2011, 09:31:10 PM »
I forgot to mention (may be irrelevant), but I want to definitely do early decision to  George Washington Law, so I will have to prepare my law school applications by December 15th.

Amicus Curiae

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2011, 09:57:09 PM »
fyi, if you have to retake the LSAT, it will be October, not September... just so you know.

collegebum1989

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2011, 11:30:15 PM »
Yeah your right sorry about that, it takes about a month to get your scores, so I'll still be able to apply in December.

iracafella

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2011, 02:25:27 AM »
I was one of those people who scored low on the LSAT the first time, then worked extremely hard for the next go-round. Let me tell you, the LSAT is beyond any test you have faced. GMAT, LSAT, and MCAT are 3 big tests, but each one unique. The LSAT is notorious for taking a looooong time to prepare for. I don't ever tell people to work their brains out for it, but only to taaaake their tiiime. That was my big mistake, I underestimated it, then rushed it. It tests things that take a while to learn. I just want u to think of that as your main thing right now, one thing at a time.

FalconJimmy

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2011, 09:32:44 AM »
The only reason I was considering the full-time job is maybe to relieve some of the debt I've incurred due to graduate school. Also, I was thinking that if I had a full-time job, I can focus on starting my career at a company in the unfortunate event I don't get into any law schools.

I would find it unlikely that you'd be unable to get into any law school at all.  Apply at a few, have a safety or two.



The only reason I was considering the full-time job is maybe to relieve some of the debt I've incurred due to graduate school. Also, I was thinking that if I had a full-time job, I can focus on starting my career at a company in the unfortunate event I don't get into any law schools.

The research route is definitely compelling, and I know that nothing I do in the next year will affect my law school admissions, but how about employment after law school? Or will it be negligible based on how I perform in law school.

The only thing you want if you hope to work in the law, is a high class rank from the best school you can get into.  Most other factors will be negligible at best.  Though, if you hope to work in IP law, a master's in engineering (especially EE) is a big plus.

iracafella

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Re: Year between Grad School and Law School - What to Do?
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2011, 04:34:49 PM »


The only thing you want if you hope to work in the law, is a high class rank from the best school you can get into.  Most other factors will be negligible at best.  Though, if you hope to work in IP law, a master's in engineering (especially EE) is a big plus.
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I agree to an extent, Mr. Falcon, but I think there is more to that story. On one hand, yea law school teaches you what you need to know to be a lawyer, all else before that may help, but it is not a game-breaker. Only a minority of professions in law would be helped by having a masters in something. BUT, if you want one of those professions, like mr. falcon said, then that is good and go for it. BUT, there is one other thing: if you become a lawyer, your prior history of masters degrees or previous accomplishments will matter for a few reasons: 1 is that if you were a private attorney, the laypeople of the world search for lawyers, and may be dramatically impressed by someone with a masters in a field that is relevant to what they want a lawyer for. The average layman may pick you, due to your credentials, even though fellow law people like on this site may see it is not being a game-breaker. 2 is that if your law career involves any factor of clout, like working for a state's attorney general office, then more notches on your belt will open more doors. A lot of times, a judge or attorney will excel past others in law professions, and any one can notice that they also have a masters, or good political/career experience, etc. So there are many factors, but generally, I think you are on the right track. But do investigate the LSAT to see if your study period is adequate to score what you want to score. The law school u go to, or your GPA there, are just one of many factors that will define what happens afterward, IMO