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Jhoward7414

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???
« on: December 24, 2011, 08:12:13 PM »
Hello everyone,
 I have currently decided to go back to school @ the age of 30, I have thought seriously about something to do with law since I am a bit familiar with the other side of it, not sure exactly what I would like to due i.e. Lawyer, Parole/Probation Officer, etc. But I had a couple of questions to anyone who cares to answer...

Are there any background issues to worry about when it comes to making a decision on being anything that has to do with Law?
Are the schools that teach different law practices? Like if you wanted to be a criminal lawyer would you go to a different school than if you wanted to be a civil lawyer?

I want to become a lawyer for a couple reasons, one of which is this. I have had many dealings with the law in the city I have grown up in, I have seen many people including myself abused and basically over taken by a gross misuse of the System. Recently I have become more interested in the actual politics in the city that started when a Pastor was asked to leave a County Commission Public Meeting, where he was accused of being out of order and clearly wasn't out of order you can see what I mean at this link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MApjMm-I9_E&feature=share
This really made me feel like someone has to do something about this, my real problem is I don't exactly know what.
Anyways my question about this is, what part of Law should I be focusing on if changing my community is my focus? I realize that its a question that doesn't only pertain to Law issues but in the sense of I want to be involved in the process in which Laws are passed or even created for that matter.

Again any advice you can give would be great. So in advance thanks...

FalconJimmy

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Re: ???
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2011, 12:46:11 PM »
Seasons Greetings!

You will find by and large that almost all law schools teach exactly the same courses (especially during the first year), use all the same textbooks and the professors all come from the same schools (usually Harvard and Yale).  This is true from the best schools in the country all the way down to the least-regarded.  Any ABA accredited school allows you to sit for the bar and practice law in all 50 states.

What I would advise is that when you start Law School, to keep an open mind.  You can do your research and figure out everything you can, but you'll learn more in your first year in Law school about the jobs and options available than you could learn in 5 years of trying to ferret out the information on your own.

All schools teach constitutional law and criminal law.  Those both seem to be closely related to what you're interested in.  (Criminal law may seem an odd fit at first glance, but remember, half of criminal law is the people saying, "this person is NOT a criminal.")

Other than that, not a lot of specific guidance, but if you ask me, one aspect of the law that is not given enough attention is the ability of people to change our country for the better using the law.  When I think of the civil rights struggles in the mid 20th century, it's obvious that a great deal of that progress was made by attorneys in courtrooms.  I am a firm believer in the majesty of the law and the fact that all men are equal before the law.  It can truly be a force for good.

Best of luck in your pursuits!

lawschoolsurvival

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Re: ???
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2011, 05:29:34 PM »
I can't speak for all states, but Illinois does have some fairly strict background requirements for being accepted into the bar. Often times, a law school will not accept you if they think that you won't be eligible for the Bar. You will have to disclose all of your prior arrests and convictions, as well as the little stuff like traffic tickets.

If we are talking about things such as fraud, violence, or theft, you will likely not be considered for Bar entrance. The reason for this is that lawyers are entrusted with peoples lives and often times, large amounts of money in the form of trusts or estate management. You can sometimes get in with things such as a DUI on your record, but I have heard that two DUI's is seen as big red flag.
www.LawSchoolSurvival.org  - Tips, tricks, and strategies for surviving law school and the bar exam.

iracafella

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Re: ???
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2011, 08:05:16 PM »
I like that video. In your proverbial face government!!  If you want to be a lawyer, corruption is a pretty standard part of the game though, original poster guy. Dealing with butt hole judges that abuse their discretion and frustrate justice are basically a dime a dozen. That video will surprise you less and less, the more you learn about the law - :D

Jhoward7414

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Re: ???
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2011, 10:40:43 PM »
I can't speak for all states, but Illinois does have some fairly strict background requirements for being accepted into the bar. Often times, a law school will not accept you if they think that you won't be eligible for the Bar. You will have to disclose all of your prior arrests and convictions, as well as the little stuff like traffic tickets.

If we are talking about things such as fraud, violence, or theft, you will likely not be considered for Bar entrance. The reason for this is that lawyers are entrusted with peoples lives and often times, large amounts of money in the form of trusts or estate management. You can sometimes get in with things such as a DUI on your record, but I have heard that two DUI's is seen as big red flag.

My convictions aren't that serious as an adult, all misdemeanors nothing to do with fraud or theft, a couple marijuana possesions and misdemeanor battery, my main concern is my Juvenile record, still nothing to do with fraud or theft but many seroius charges none the less, I live in Florida where as I am pretty sure it is everywhere, Juvy records are sealed, but I ask because even on the last time i was in court as a defendant the States Attorney brought up my juvy stuff so while it may be sealed to the outside it had never been sealed to them...