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Author Topic: From a recently barred attorney - What I wish I knew before I went to law school  (Read 7027 times)

justanothersucker

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Thus one of many options.  Not trying due to fear (or plain laziness) basicly proves my point.

Sucker, what universe do you live in?  FBI jobs are highly competitive.

jonlevy

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Why is anyone entitled to a job? You have a license to practice, get off you lazy behinds and go to work. Take a weekend seminar, buy some practice books and you are good to go with
Social Security Disability, Workers Comp, or Immigration. Go hang out at the courts and pick up the conflict public defender cases, juvenile or child custody cases nobody wants.
You will do a Hell of a lot better for people and society in general than at some law firm catering to corporations and the fees start to roll ion after a while.  The work is also 100% more interesting.

GGI

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Also, one of the advantages of becoming an attorney is that you can set up on your own, and don't have to look necessarily for a "job".
I know of quite a few people who have started out on their own and are doing quite well.
Of course it helps if you do not have big student loans to repay, and you can keep your costs to a minimum by working from home at least initially.
When eventually you do find a job, you can always pass your book of clients to a colleague if you do not wish to retain them.

Pegeg12

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Attorney Jobs California
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2013, 04:42:44 AM »
Hi..Nice post..we BCG Attorney Search is a name that has become synonymous with success in placing attorneys in top law firms throughout the country.

lawyurd

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There is also the option of joining the military and being a JAG.  This is a great option that I think many on these forums overlook.  Some of my friends were JAGs and they liked their job.

Duncanjp

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Given the current state of the legal field, it's certainly risky to enroll in law school if one does not have a clear purpose for doing so.

A Terrible Purpose
"I want to be a lawyer because my favorite TV shows are courtroom dramas."

A Better Purpose
"I have spent five years in [insert field] and a law degree would advance my career in that field."

jack24

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There is also the option of joining the military and being a JAG.  This is a great option that I think many on these forums overlook.  Some of my friends were JAGs and they liked their job.

Some of your friends were JAG?  How long ago?  Do you have any idea how hard it is to land a JAG gig now?   They get like 100 strong applicants for every position.

lawyurd

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There is also the option of joining the military and being a JAG.  This is a great option that I think many on these forums overlook.  Some of my friends were JAGs and they liked their job.

Some of your friends were JAG?  How long ago?  Do you have any idea how hard it is to land a JAG gig now?   They get like 100 strong applicants for every position.


I've been out of the Marines since December 2009.   I'm not sure how hard it was to land a JAG position for them.  I know at least 3 of them actually went to law school while in the Marine Corps, so they got promoted faster even though we started training at the same time.   I mean want to say that each class had 6 spots for future JAGs and there were 6 classes a year.   

Officer Candidate School weeds out a lot of people.  My OCS class had a 48% retention,  not sure how many of them were lawyers.   Lots of people can't handle the physical demands of the Marine Corps and OCS is even tougher than enlisted boot camp.  The Marines also have programs that active duty members can apply for that they send you to law school and that's your job for 3 years,  you just have to graduate, pass the bar and then owe 5 years to the Corps.  I had a friend qualify for that program but I don't think she graduated since she works for Amazon now as a recruiter.   

Sorry for being all over the map here, I'll talk Marine Corps all day.

Duncanjp

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I've been out of the Marines since December 2009.   I'm not sure how hard it was to land a JAG position for them.  I know at least 3 of them actually went to law school while in the Marine Corps, so they got promoted faster even though we started training at the same time.   I mean want to say that each class had 6 spots for future JAGs and there were 6 classes a year.   

Officer Candidate School weeds out a lot of people.  My OCS class had a 48% retention,  not sure how many of them were lawyers.   Lots of people can't handle the physical demands of the Marine Corps and OCS is even tougher than enlisted boot camp.  The Marines also have programs that active duty members can apply for that they send you to law school and that's your job for 3 years,  you just have to graduate, pass the bar and then owe 5 years to the Corps.  I had a friend qualify for that program but I don't think she graduated since she works for Amazon now as a recruiter.   

Sorry for being all over the map here, I'll talk Marine Corps all day.

Semper fi, Lawyurd.

In my con law class last night, we were discussing how difficult it is to hold down a career position during the day while putting oneself through law school at night. I remarked that my four years in the Marine Corps was a cakewalk compared to the four-year madhouse of law school. Of course, that isn't really true, but it feels like it sometimes.

jack24

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Sorry for being all over the map here, I'll talk Marine Corps all day.

No problem.  That is good information.   I would just submit that it's much harder to get a JAG position if you are in law school and have no prior relationship with the military.   I know one student from my school who landed a JAG position with the Army, but he managed to do ROTC while he was in law school.