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Author Topic: Would apreciate any advise, thanks.  (Read 718 times)

wccobb

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Would apreciate any advise, thanks.
« on: November 03, 2011, 11:41:53 PM »
I have had the unique opportunity to participate in a Legal Profession course designed to inform students like myself interested in attending a School of Law. Though attending a School of Law has always been the main objective, it was this course that motivated me to take the necessary steps to achieve this goal. The course was effective for a number of reasons. A federal judge taught the class, and he brought his experiences and knowledge of the profession to the course. I also had the experience of listening to practicing lawyers tell a realistic assessment of the current profession and the difficulties that accompany it, but it wasn’t until I saw a case presentation of the Sixteenth Street Bombing that my decision was really solidified. It was presented in such a way that I assessed my own abilities and motives for attending a School of Law.
   Our class was invited by Attorney Doug Jones to see the same presentation that he has shown to attorneys and judges on a national level. The case was intense and so important to the progression of Alabama that it would truly be a shame to attempt to describe it in words without actually being there. The pictures and testimonies were the same. Along with the case, what resonated with me most were two statements. He told us that the case was a “once in a lifetime case,” and he also informed that “Justice delayed does not mean justice denied,” It was these two statements that made me question why I really wanted to attend a School of Law.
   The first statement was simple. Even though I have a desire to litigate high profile cases, I know that the majority of lawyers do not get the opportunity and most times pursue other goals. I realistically do not want to be an Atticus Finch or a John Grisham character, and that leads to the second statement. The foundation of my motivation lies with the desire to learn the law in order to represent and inform the uninformed. Growing up in south Alabama and the black belt there have been occasions when I have witnessed people being taken advantage of, because, I along with them did not understand laws that protected certain rights. In many cases, people are denied justice, not because of oppression or opportunity, but for the mere fact that those individuals were unaware of laws that protected them. I want to know the law. I believe I have acquired the skills in my undergraduate education to allow me to excel in a School of Law, and allow me to represent those who have been denied that justice in which all people deserve and are granted by law.
   It is my undergraduate education that has sharpened my ability and skills. Semester after semester with the guidance of my professors I have become more clear in articulating my own thesis arguments, better in structuring research papers, but more than anything, the ability to conduct proper research. I’ve had so many opportunities to be involved in extracurricular activities, the opportunity to have my own written play produced, the privilege of leading a lecture in front of my peers, but that has not resonated with me as much as having the necessary ability to write proper research papers. It is with the repetition of preparation and research throughout obtaining my English Degree that has allowed me to develop my most useful skill. Preparation through research is essential, and the accumulation of small useful information is as powerful as small ripples of current flowing into a clear river of knowledge. This development of my researching and writing skill will allow me to adapt and master any task put before me. I understand the pressures and burden that consists of being a Law student and the rigors that come with the experience. I believe that I am ready and prepared to take on the task that stands before me when given the opportunity. 


I feel like it's all over the place, and any advise would be great.Thanks for the help

fortook

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Re: Would apreciate any advise, thanks.
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2011, 06:55:38 PM »
I'll admit I didn't read all through that, but what are you asking?  Briefly please. :).
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

wccobb

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Re: Would apreciate any advise, thanks.
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 05:44:10 PM »
Haha. I guess you already answered my question. My question would be if it seems too boring or disorganized. Thank you for responding

fortook

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Re: Would apreciate any advise, thanks.
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2011, 10:58:22 PM »
Whoa, is that your PS?  I didn't know that.  Your PS and LSD are two completely different animals which require different levels of attention to be paid by the reader. 

I feel obligated by decency to read through it now:  It is slightly hard to follow, but not boring.  The third and fourth paragraphs make your key points pretty well.  Overall, I dig your appeal and passion.  Moreover, I like your humility- definitely keep that.  Only concrete input I can give is to simplify it a bit for an admissions staff who more than likely skims as much as reads PSs.  Hopefully they won't skim as much as I did and miss your whole point :).  Sorry about that. Good luck.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

john4040

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Re: Would apreciate any advise, thanks.
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2011, 10:01:32 PM »
"Would apreciate any advise, thanks."

You should learn how to spell "advice."  Hope this helps.