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Author Topic: Solid Strategy for Law School?  (Read 1269 times)

clauxy

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Solid Strategy for Law School?
« on: October 16, 2011, 06:09:57 PM »
Hey guys, I'm a sophomore in college and starting to develop plans for grad school/law school. I graduate in Spring 2014, and was thinking of skipping Fall 2014 to study more for the LSAT and apply to law school in the spring of 2015. Also, I feel this would give me time to take the GRE if I get a subpar LSAT score. My main reason behind this is that I don't want to be in my final semester at school, taking 4000 level classes/language courses and studying for the LSAT at the same time, trying to get into Fall 2014 law.

Any thoughts or should I not try to skip a semester to focus purely on the LSAT? Thanks!
-Chris

P.S. - I heard taking critical thinking (a philosophy course at my school), is solid preparation for the games section and analytical parts of the test.

justanothersucker

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2011, 08:39:58 PM »
skip a semester?

-No. Don't do that.

Focus on getting your BA. If you want to take a "semester off" to study for the LSAT, then let it be the semester AFTER you graduate. I know you are thinking "but I want to go to lawschool right after....." Trust me. Finish the BA.

prelaw12

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2011, 09:17:26 PM »
I find it awesome that you are thinking about your goals this early in you college career. However, I would not take a semester off if you can avoid it. A tip would be, if you have the time, not to study rigorously for the lsat for 3 or 4 months like many people do. (because you are right, it WILL show up in your grades in school) Because you already know your graduation time and when you want to take the lsat, study the lsat comprehensively at a nice steady pace. If you can work with the lsat steadily for a year or 18 months, rather than vigorously for 3 months, it might serve you much better. You will gain much more experience with the lsat and retain more knowledge of the test. I have been studying every aspect of the test for about 8 months now, and I still have 8 months until I take the test. I am enrolled in 18 credit hours, and will be enrolled in that many for two more semesters. I only study the lsat when I have free time and am not needing to work on homework and such. Many people will probably tell you that you need to put in hours and hours and hours a week for 3 months or something like that. However, this is not always the case. I took a preptest when I first started studying the lsat and scored a 147. Through 8 months of steady but comprehensive studying, I am almost at a 160. You will nail the lsat fundamentals into your head if you study steadily for a long period of time, rather than hardcore for a few months.

clauxy

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2011, 10:37:33 PM »
I'm sorry, I think you guys misunderstood what I was saying. My intention was always to get my B.A.  I'm talking about the semester after I graduate.  Is it worth it to take 1 semester off and study and apply for spring or go right from graduating with my B.A. to law school the next semester? Thanks

justanothersucker

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2011, 01:26:35 PM »
Honestly, I'd take a term off to do nothing and relax. You'll be glad you did once it gets started.
I hear of rich kids taking a "year off" to tour Europe. That would be nice. Closest I've come is two week vacations in Mexico and Canada! :)

I'm sorry, I think you guys misunderstood what I was saying. My intention was always to get my B.A.  I'm talking about the semester after I graduate.  Is it worth it to take 1 semester off and study and apply for spring or go right from graduating with my B.A. to law school the next semester? Thanks

gaviocks

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2011, 01:56:52 AM »
hello future lawyers,

My father is thinking in sending me to a law schools here in detroit and I'm a bit interested in taking this course too. Wish you have any advice before I will enter this course.
If you are searching for a total privacy in your surroundings then you might need to be inform that there are some companies like acoustic testing that are studying give you a perfect surrounding.

fortook

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2011, 10:40:29 PM »
The vast majority of law schools only have fall admission.  You'll typically have to take a year off and skip a whole cycle to do that.  Only the really big ones have spring admissions- Cooley, Ubalt, Rutgers and Pace come to mind and I'm not even sure about them, I'm sure there are a few more but not many. 
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

justanothersucker

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2011, 08:45:52 PM »
Anyone else who hit puberty yet see anything wrong with the first sentence of that post?

hello future lawyers,

My father is thinking in sending me to a law schools here in detroit and I'm a bit interested in taking this course too. Wish you have any advice before I will enter this course.

justanothersucker

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2011, 08:45:08 PM »
who cares if he flunks it? Apparenlty Daddy is going to pay full ride. Might as well get a 150, who cares right?

fortook

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Re: Solid Strategy for Law School?
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2011, 02:46:14 PM »
two different people posting.  We don't know if the OP is rich.

Rich guy- don't take Kaplan, I found it to be useless.  Powerscore might be a better choice.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."