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Author Topic: T4 to T4  (Read 1828 times)

staroflife

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T4 to T4
« on: September 28, 2011, 01:08:44 PM »
I was wondering if anyone has ever transferred into UDC-Law. I am looking to transfer into there from another low end T4 school for circumstances outside of law school. School ranking does not matter to me, so please don't give me a hard time about that.

I am new to law school and the process of transferring and was wondering if anyone could give me some solid advice.

FalconJimmy

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2011, 04:37:51 PM »
I was wondering if anyone has ever transferred into UDC-Law. I am looking to transfer into there from another low end T4 school for circumstances outside of law school. School ranking does not matter to me, so please don't give me a hard time about that.

I am new to law school and the process of transferring and was wondering if anyone could give me some solid advice.

Most t4 schools need students.  I honestly don't think it's that hard to transfer into a T4, presuming reasonable grades.

staroflife

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2011, 06:53:09 PM »
Good to know... thanks for the information. When you say "reasonable grades," do you mean B's and C's minimum? 

kjw5029

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2011, 07:11:38 PM »
What year are you? First year?

I've never heard of anyone doing this before, but I imagine it happens occasionally.  I think a T4 would be happy to have another student transfer to their school.  I can't imagine what grade requirement they would really have, but it certainly would be less than transferring upwards in the rankings.  Why don't you just call the admissions office and ask them what kind of grades they require?  That would be your best bet.

staroflife

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2011, 07:27:34 PM »
 I am a first year law student.

Like I said, I am transferring as a matter of location rather than ranking. For what I am doing as far as a career, ranking does not matter.

My only concern is that my school releases grades 3-4 weeks into the next semester (maximum time limit - they could release earlier). I don't know how much of an issue that will be when it comes time to put in the paperwork with only 1 semester's worth of grades.

Also, does anyone have any advice on how to ask for a recommendation without offending the school/professor?

All serious input is welcomed. Thanks!

Hamilton

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2011, 10:50:38 PM »
Ranking ALWAYS matters when it comes to landing a job, unless you are not going to be a practicing attorney - which then raises the question as to why waste the time and money on law school.  UDM is certainly viewed better than Cooley, so the switch is worth it.  I would be careful trying to transfer with Cs.


Like I said, I am transferring as a matter of location rather than ranking. For what I am doing as far as a career, ranking does not matter.

staroflife

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2011, 02:20:43 PM »
I do not plan on being a practicing attorney, and my motives for getting a law degree are irrelevant.

Hamilton, have you transferred out of Cooley? I'm assuming so because you recognized the grade release timeline. How was the process for you? Feel free to send me a private message.

FalconJimmy

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2011, 03:22:55 PM »
Also, does anyone have any advice on how to ask for a recommendation without offending the school/professor?

I've given that a lot of thought.  Face it, in T-4 land, your profs didn't go to your school.  They understand the desire to go to a good school.  This is where establishing some rapport with the professor throughout the semester will probably yield some good results.  It's a lot to expect that if all they know about you is that you handed in an anonymous exam that ended up getting a good grade, that they would then feel comfortable recommending you for something.

If you participate in their class (in a positive manner), and they know your name, that's a good start.  If you've stopped by during office hours to talk to them about an area of the law where they have a particular expertise, all the better.

If you've done those two things, you'll have established yourself as a student whom they probably appreciate.  As such, chances are they'll want to see you do well. 

Although law profs know what side their bread is buttered on, they also view themselves as fiercely independent.  So, for a student they don't know from Adam, they might well think, "Hey, why not stay here and keep paying my salary."  But for a student they have made a personal connection with, I'd say they're more likely to think of you as somebody they want to help.  Regardless of how it impacts their employer, they're likely to want to help you.  Good professors, at least, are in this to try and help people, or at least that's somewhere in their mix of motivations.

fortook

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Re: T4 to T4
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2011, 07:23:15 PM »
I can think of a few T4s that are preferable to others.  On one of these threads someone was asking about Appalachian and it came out that its in the middle of no where and has employment stats under 50% (how is that even possible?) vs a school like Dayton.  I have known a few successful Dayton grads even though its a T4.

I can understand why someone would want to transfer from Cooley to UDC.  There are market saturation issues in MI.  DC is a much better job market.  Also, the tuition is a fraction of Cooley's.  I'd imagine its doable.
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