Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Question of the day  (Read 1917 times)

lawyerintraining

  • Guest
Re: Question of the day
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2011, 10:52:41 PM »
Online training is more vigorous than brick and mortar training...

This should be good...

because you have a shorter period of time within which  a lot of material needs to be  absorbed.

How so?  You mean you take the equivalent of 15 semester hours of information from an ABA school and you do it in less than a semester?

And, most law school exams are  open book. 

Perhaps.  Not in my case this semester.

Online law school exams are  not.

Pray, tell, how would anybody know if your book was open or not?

You make a lot of assumptions. 1) How do you know if they are allowed to do their semesters (at his school) faster than the regular semester?
2) How do you know that they aren't required to be proctored by an approved proctor at a local college?

FalconJimmy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Question of the day
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2011, 11:07:09 PM »
You make a lot of assumptions. 1) How do you know if they are allowed to do their semesters (at his school) faster than the regular semester?
2) How do you know that they aren't required to be proctored by an approved proctor at a local college?

As always, you require assistance in basic reading comprehension.

As to question 1, I don't.  That's why I said "the equivalent of 15 semester hours of information from an ABA school and you do it in less than a semester".

This requires me to introduce a few concepts.

First, the concept of "an intelligent, literate person", which you are not.

Second, if we presume an "intelligent literate person", they would be able to understand the concept of "equivalent of 15 semester hours", versus a statement like "15 semester hours".  Perhaps they're taking 1 semester hour.  An intelligent, literate person (again, please use your imagination, here, basically somebody much smarter than you or anybody you've ever met in person), would think, "Well... the equivalent of 15 semester hours would be 15 times more than I'm taking, and that would take (more/less) than about a semester's worth of time.


2) How do you know that they aren't required to be proctored by an approved proctor at a local college?

I don't.  Hence, I asked, "a question".  See previous note about "intelligent, literate person".

Now, go back to studying your "6th grade English for Dummies" book and let the grown ups have a conversation, 'kay?  Zach and Cody are on Disney channel and there's cookies in the kitchen.

lawyerintraining

  • Guest
Re: Question of the day
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2011, 12:04:53 AM »
You make a lot of assumptions. 1) How do you know if they are allowed to do their semesters (at his school) faster than the regular semester?
2) How do you know that they aren't required to be proctored by an approved proctor at a local college?

As always, you require assistance in basic reading comprehension.

As to question 1, I don't.  That's why I said "the equivalent of 15 semester hours of information from an ABA school and you do it in less than a semester".

This requires me to introduce a few concepts.

First, the concept of "an intelligent, literate person", which you are not.

Second, if we presume an "intelligent literate person", they would be able to understand the concept of "equivalent of 15 semester hours", versus a statement like "15 semester hours".  Perhaps they're taking 1 semester hour.  An intelligent, literate person (again, please use your imagination, here, basically somebody much smarter than you or anybody you've ever met in person), would think, "Well... the equivalent of 15 semester hours would be 15 times more than I'm taking, and that would take (more/less) than about a semester's worth of time.


2) How do you know that they aren't required to be proctored by an approved proctor at a local college?

I don't.  Hence, I asked, "a question".  See previous note about "intelligent, literate person".

Now, go back to studying your "6th grade English for Dummies" book and let the grown ups have a conversation, 'kay?  Zach and Cody are on Disney channel and there's cookies in the kitchen.

A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply.[1] Rhetorical questions encourage the listener to think about what the (often obvious) answer to the question must be. When a speaker states, "How much longer must our people endure this injustice?", no formal answer is expected. Rather, it is a rhetorical device used by the speaker to assert or deny something (e.g., "Can you do anything right?") While amusing and often humorous, rhetorical questions are rarely meant for pure, comedic effect. A carefully crafted question can, if delivered well, persuade an audience to believe in the position(s) of the speaker


passaroa25

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 229
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Question of the day
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2011, 06:40:12 PM »
It appears that you, lawyer in training,  have not had the brick and mortar law school and online law school experiences.  Otherwise, you would not be asking such theoretical questions.  If you read and brief 3000+ contract, criminal law, and tort court opinions, write and re-write 150 contract, criminal law, and tort essays, while studying, at least, 1200 multiple choice questions, it will take you more than one year to remember everything you have read. 
Angie

Hamilton

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 337
    • View Profile
Re: Question of the day
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2011, 10:04:50 AM »
Thank God for Lopez.  Hopefully the Robert's court will show some sanity - unfortunately I fear it will be a political vote with legal interpretations twisted to support the political opinion of the justices.  We can always pray for intellectual honesty though...

The answer is C.

I almost certain that we'll get some sort of definitive answer as to the scope of the Commerce Clause. The denial of Virginia's writ of certiorari to the SOTUS notwithstanding, the Court will have to decide the constitutionality of the healthcare reform legislation with regards to the Commerce Clause. This should be interesting. I don't see how the Court gets around putting some sort of limits on Congress's power here.