Law Students > L.L.M. Board

Is an LLM worth it?

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chi2009:
So frustrated with the conflicting advice on this topic. I'm beginning my 3L year at Chicago-Kent, which has an LLM program in tax (tax is the only LLM I would consider).  I plan to go into tax law and have worked in the school's tax clinic for 2 semesters, handling real cases in US Tax Court.  So, the question is: Do I graduate in Dec 2012 with a JD and maybe go back for an LLM later (if at all), OR do I stay 1 extra semester and graduate in May 2013 with a JD/LLM in tax? 

I've generally heard that an LLM will only help if I do transactional work, but won't matter if I stick with litigation.  I want to be done with school, but if I ever get the LLM, doing it in 1 semester and double dipping the credits with the JD sounds a lot better than doing it in 2 semesters later.  Either way, I will graduate with a certificate in business law, but I don't think that really means anything.  Thoughts??

FalconJimmy:
Can you talk to some practicing tax attorneys through your school's alumi association? 

Anything you get from here is anonymous advice from the internet and should be treated as such.

chi2009:
I've spoken with a handful of tax attorneys and a tax court judge, and their opinions are split.  Some insist I should get the LLM, especially since my undergrad degree is not in tax.  Others insist that, unless I plan to practice transactional law, it's a waste of time.  I've taken 1 LLM class so far (business valuation & financial statement analysis, for JD credit) and hated it, so I'm a little turned off by the transactional route.  I'm meeting with the LLM director over the break, who will obviously have his own bias.  Just really frustrated at all the conflicting advice  >:(

copperton1:
Has anyone looked at the online LLM in Taxation or Business Transactions from University of Alabama? It looks interesting because it would allow the student to continue working and not have to relocate. However, I am skeptical of how the "online" program would be received by employers, whether law firms or in-house counsels. Also, would a strong GPA, 3.7 or better in the LLM program make up for an average GPA, 3.00, from law school?

john4040:

--- Quote from: copperton1 on February 19, 2012, 02:37:06 PM ---Has anyone looked at the online LLM in Taxation or Business Transactions from University of Alabama? It looks interesting because it would allow the student to continue working and not have to relocate. However, I am skeptical of how the "online" program would be received by employers, whether law firms or in-house counsels.

--- End quote ---

Bad idea.  See my previous post.  Employers don't really value an LLM unless it's in Tax (from one of the schools I metioned above) or IP.


--- Quote from: copperton1 on February 19, 2012, 02:37:06 PM ---Also, would a strong GPA, 3.7 or better in the LLM program make up for an average GPA, 3.00, from law school?

--- End quote ---

No.

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