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Author Topic: LLM Online, No JD or LLB Required - De Monfort Uviv., 1/2 Cost of U of Liverpool  (Read 2522 times)

financialandtaxguy

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Here's another England based Law School offering an online LLM program, no need for a JD or LLB for entry.  Their tuition is almost half the cost of Univ. of Liverpool, at about $11,000 - $12,000 US Dollars for the entire program.  You can also do a 15 months accelerated version also.  They do mention an "Induction Weekend," held in Leicester, England, for the kickoff of the school year in September, and they do not mention if that is mandatory to attend or not.  Follow this link http://www.informaglobalevents.com/appdata/downloads/business-law-with-an-international-focus-master-of-laws-llm-distance-learning-course-2011-from-de-montfort-university-dmu//KW1040_-_Business_Law_by_Distance_Learning_2011.pdf

financialandtaxguy

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Major Corporations hire people with law degrees with an international flair to work in contract negotiations, international tax, and international dispute resolution.  Usually, they don't really care from which school you got your LLM.

lawyerintraining

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How can anyone claim to respect an "LLM" which dosn't reaquire a JD first? I know a guy with a masters in law who tries to claim it's the same(he is a moron and everyone who he talks to knows it)

Plus without a JD you can't practice law, so it's useless.

Reminds me of people who will get "Master certification" in 6sigma and claim they have a "masters degree" even though they are lucky to have a GED.  :P

FalconJimmy

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How can anyone claim to respect an "LLM" which dosn't reaquire a JD first?

Overseas, it's not the same as it is, here.  for instance, in England, I believe you can practice law with an LLB (Bachelor of Legal Letters).  Also, those LLB grads, if they come to the US, are allowed to sit for the bar.  (Not sure of ALL that's involved, but suffice to say that at least some, and probably most can.)

So, if you're studying under a foreign system, it's possible to get an LLM without getting a JD first.

lawyerintraining

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How can anyone claim to respect an "LLM" which dosn't reaquire a JD first?

Overseas, it's not the same as it is, here.  for instance, in England, I believe you can practice law with an LLB (Bachelor of Legal Letters).  Also, those LLB grads, if they come to the US, are allowed to sit for the bar.  (Not sure of ALL that's involved, but suffice to say that at least some, and probably most can.)

So, if you're studying under a foreign system, it's possible to get an LLM without getting a JD first.


Based on your argument you would still need a LLB(equivelent of an JD) to go into the LLM, so a raw LLM would still be worth as much as a degree from Ashwood University.  http://ashwooduniversity.net/

Most LLB's are not just a raw BA either, they have prereq's simular to those of a JD and are a "second bachelors" I know you won't be able to figure it out on your own and will as for "proof" so let me spoonfeed it to you.

http://www.edls.edu.bs/programmes.php

FalconJimmy

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How can anyone claim to respect an "LLM" which dosn't reaquire a JD first?

Overseas, it's not the same as it is, here.  for instance, in England, I believe you can practice law with an LLB (Bachelor of Legal Letters).  Also, those LLB grads, if they come to the US, are allowed to sit for the bar.  (Not sure of ALL that's involved, but suffice to say that at least some, and probably most can.)

So, if you're studying under a foreign system, it's possible to get an LLM without getting a JD first.


Based on your argument you would still need a LLB(equivelent of an JD) to go into the LLM, so a raw LLM would still be worth as much as a degree from Ashwood University.  http://ashwooduniversity.net/

Most LLB's are not just a raw BA either, they have prereq's simular to those of a JD and are a "second bachelors" I know you won't be able to figure it out on your own and will as for "proof" so let me spoonfeed it to you.

http://www.edls.edu.bs/programmes.php

Sorry, I missed this when you posted it.

As always, you're wrong.  Although what you're describing is true in Canada, in the UK, the LLB is an undergraduate program of study leading to a first degree.

It is sorta funny how you have literally never gotten anything right on these boards.  You'd think by blind luck by now you'd have stumbled onto at least one true statement.

lawyerintraining

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Is an LLB "undergrad" sure. Is still a SECOND bachelors requiring education done BEFORE it? YES!!!

Just because you are ignorant to a fact dosn't make it untrue. Read the second to last line einstein.

The Bachelor of Laws (abbreviated LL.B., LLB, or rarely, Ll.B.) is an undergraduate, or bachelor, degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England and offered in most common law countries as the primary law degree.[1] In English-speaking Canada it is sometimes referred to as a post-graduate degree because previous university education is usually required for admission. The "LL." of the abbreviation for the degree is from the genitive plural legum (of lex, legis f., law), thus "LL.B." stands for Legum Baccalaureus in Latin.


FalconJimmy

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Is an LLB "undergrad" sure. Is still a SECOND bachelors requiring education done BEFORE it? YES!!!

Just because you are ignorant to a fact dosn't make it untrue. Read the second to last line einstein.

The Bachelor of Laws (abbreviated LL.B., LLB, or rarely, Ll.B.) is an undergraduate, or bachelor, degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England and offered in most common law countries as the primary law degree.[1] In English-speaking Canada it is sometimes referred to as a post-graduate degree because previous university education is usually required for admission. The "LL." of the abbreviation for the degree is from the genitive plural legum (of lex, legis f., law), thus "LL.B." stands for Legum Baccalaureus in Latin.

Let's see... the second to last sentence:

<<In English-speaking Canada it is sometimes referred to as a post-graduate degree because previous university education is usually required for admission.>>

Hmmm... applying my Einstein-like intellect... or wait, you were being ironic... applying my non-Einstein intellect, that accounts for a statement like:  "Although what you're describing is true in Canada..."

Since I specifically mentioned "overseas", I should probably hip you to this tiny bit of trivia:  Canada is not separated from the US by a sea of any kind.  A few great lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway, but not a sea. 

Which would bring in the first part of what you quoted:

<<The Bachelor of Laws (abbreviated LL.B., LLB, or rarely, Ll.B.) is an undergraduate, or bachelor, degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England and offered in most common law countries as the primary law degree>>

Seems relatively straightforward to me.  However, because I already presented this information to you and you seem to have chosen to reject it, I am, for some reason unknown to both god and man, inclined to believe that you do possess basic skills of reading comprehension and that I must have presented faulty or unclear information.

Our universities are based on the UK university model, but the schools in the UK are far more influenced by tradition.  They're confusing in a lot of programs (or for the UK folks, "programmes") of study.

I hope you'll pardon that I'm using wikipedia, but given that I do not have Einstein-like abilities of intellect, I have to try and get through law school largely on brute force of working through the material.  As such, I will have to crack a book here in a few minutes.

England and English common law countriesMain article: Legal education in the United Kingdom
In England, Australia, New Zealand and other English common law countries, a law degree is usually an undergraduate qualification, with the LL.B being the most common. In Australia & New Zealand, law may be taken as a Combined Law degree with another major as a five-year joint degree, instead of possibly six years for both degrees separately.[14][15][16]

After undergraduate qualification (the LLB) further study is necessary prior to practise. To become a solicitor one must complete the Legal Practice Course and subsequently complete a two year training contract. For the bar one must complete the LLB, the Bar Professional Training Course (formerly the Bar Vocational Course) and then obtain a pupillage (legal apprenticeship) prior to becoming a tenant in chambers.

While the LLB is undertaken at a University the latter professional courses are undertaken at for profit professional schools such as the BPP School of Law. Rarely, some students study the BPTC at the City Law School (formerly Inns of Court School of Law) which is the oldest legal training provider.


Contrast to their entry on that other overseas country, Canada:

Given that the Canadian legal system includes both the French civil law and the Anglo-American common law, some law schools offer both an LL.B. (common law) and a B.C.L. (civil law) degree, such as McGill University and the University of Ottawa. Some universities such as the University of Toronto, Osgoode Hall Law School, Queen's University, The University of Western Ontario, The University of Windsor and University of British Columbia have changed the name of their degree to that of a J.D.

Good luck to you.  Really.  Not sure if you're in law school or not, but if you are, we'd be much better served to be going at each other on case law than on sniping each other on matters of trivia.