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In 2010, twice as many bar passers as job openings

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Jhuen_the_bird:

--- Quote from: sollicitus on March 08, 2012, 03:59:19 PM ---The judges personalities is for sure a thing you have to pick up along with way (along with other personalities depending on who you commonly have as your OP and if you have to deal with juries, etc, I am sure) No way to beat that but doing it first hand multiple times.

As for the "extra" papers. What type of stuff is that normally? I know the clerks "can't give legal advise" (and they think that is even though the courts have rules that helping give directions on papers is NOT legal advise, they still hide behind the lie due to laziness(etc) ) but I am suprised the schools can't mention those papers in classes like pretrial skills or trial prep.

Can you give a few examples for those of use still novus to it?

--- End quote ---

Well, one of the local juvenile courts won't let you file requests for production of documents.  The clerks will turn you away.  They just WON'T let you file them.  It's not really "right" ... but it's weird and you feel like an idiot when they treat you like one.  Another example, a certain judge in juvenile court in another court "doesn't do shared parenting" for never-married couples who have a kid.  That's also wrong in the law, but it's sole custody + visitation or nothing in that court.  Also, another judge in domestic relations court actually has a somewhat "secretive" chart that lays out spousal support based on the number of years married.  It's just HIS form (since judges have discretion on that) and it's what he uses to determine the spousal support EVERY time.  It's not on the website and it's a paper that the local attorneys just share with each other.  Weird stuff like that are good examples I can remember!

sollicitus:
wow. I guess it varies by district. Interesting stuff.

On the parts other than judges discretion, have you thought about contacting the bar to file complaints or asking clients to do the same if they feel their rights adversely affected?

A judge about 5 years ago "retired" after refusing to allow miscogenation marriages "for the good of future children".  The never married parental rights issue seems very simular to that from a rights perspective.

And anytime anyone "refuses" to do their job, heck start with the bar and then try it in the media. Just get the turds flushed out.

Jhuen_the_bird:

--- Quote from: sollicitus on March 08, 2012, 06:53:19 PM ---wow. I guess it varies by district. Interesting stuff.

On the parts other than judges discretion, have you thought about contacting the bar to file complaints or asking clients to do the same if they feel their rights adversely affected?

A judge about 5 years ago "retired" after refusing to allow miscogenation marriages "for the good of future children".  The never married parental rights issue seems very simular to that from a rights perspective.

And anytime anyone "refuses" to do their job, heck start with the bar and then try it in the media. Just get the turds flushed out.

--- End quote ---

I think a lot of attorneys end up putting up with this, because in order to pursue something that would require the client to have the money to pay you to do so.  Otherwise, a lot of DR attorneys are already too busy to worry about it.  Some more established attorneys even refuse to take any matters in certain counties, bc of bad experiences!

sollicitus:
I believe you on all counts, I'm just saying that if I notice a trend in any place I have to practice (even in a court that dosn't directly affect me-like juvie cout) I will snitch them all out. I hate lazy people, crooked people, dumb/incompetent people,etc.

I will (legally) burn that mother'f'er down. (figurative of course)

If it costs me money, fine. I hate them that much. Let it cost money.
Cheaper than smoking crack and twice the high.

Jhuen_the_bird:
I'm not sure if bar associations can do anything about this, though.  The only real recourse is appealing, and if your client doesn't want to or can't afford it, then you just don't.  I think you're overestimating how much money lawyers have to "just do" things ... Or if you work for a firm, they tell you what to do.  Judges are elected here, so I guess you could campaign against them?  Might not work out, though.

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