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In 2010, twice as many bar passers as job openings

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unknownOne:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304793504576434074172649718.html

Excerpts:

--- Quote ---"In 2010, there were more than twice as many people—about 54,000—who passed the bar exam than there were legal job openings in the U.S., according to an analysis by consultants at Economic Modeling Specialists Inc." [....]
"Only about one-quarter of last year's graduating law-school classes—down from 33% in 2009—snagged positions with big law firms."

--- End quote ---

sollicitus:
Clearly the answer is to have less people pass the bar!

DAMN YOU BARBRI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ::)

Plus, we could get into the whole (rehashing for the billionth time) argument of starting ones own firm/ starting at a clinic while working a nonlegal job on the side, entering as a court clerk/paralegal,blah,blah,blah........

Jhuen_the_bird:
Hah.  Starting your own practice is only good for tons of stress and no money.  I know from experience.  It took me 6 months to give up on that little experiment born from desperation!

sollicitus:

--- Quote from: Jhuen_the_bird on March 06, 2012, 06:00:52 PM ---Hah.  Starting your own practice is only good for tons of stress and no money.  I know from experience.  It took me 6 months to give up on that little experiment born from desperation!

--- End quote ---

Someone with actual real world experience and not just rehashing BS they read online or heard in class............ ;D  VERY REFRESHING!

Just out of curiosity what type of law did you practice in those 6 months, how did you find clients/very many/how much would you say you made overall and what were your overall costs for that period? Was it just you or you and a few other grads? Did you get absorbed into a firm, find a non legal job, or just hop into a line at the soup kitchen(nothing wrong with soup, I love it)

I ask since I am curious about hearing real life experience on it. Was it just the lack of clients or what? Don't most businesses (legal or non) take at least 2 years to grow regardless of what you are selling?

Duncanjp:
That article certainly makes a case for not going to law school until a person has spent some time in a given industry and can state with specificity why he or she wants to attend law school, what law school can do for that person, and what that person can do for the legal profession. Too many people attend law school with no greater sense of purpose than "I want to be a lawyer," having no clear idea of what that really entails or why they think they want it.

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