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Author Topic: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS  (Read 1331 times)

BC2L

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Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« on: May 29, 2011, 02:42:11 PM »
I am at BC top 15% 2L with a summer job. I originally transferred from a T2 top 10%. I really want to teach in the future and I want to go to Michigan or Chicago.

Can it be done?

haus

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2011, 03:53:57 PM »
Can it be done? I do not know.

I can tell you what you already know, it is not common. I suspect that if either of the schools would even consider you as a late transfer, be prepared for a minimum number of residency credits that may be greater than the number of courses that you would otherwise need to graduate.

Given the limited number of school you are considering, I would suggested contacting the administration offices directly.

Happy Hunting,

kjw5029

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2011, 04:06:45 PM »
So you're a 2L looking to transfer for your third year?  I don't think there is generally a categorical exclusion to doing so, but most (I think all) of the schools I applied to after my 1L year had a transfer units cap.  The caps were usually 30 although some were higher (like 34?). You should really look into that.  If you transferred after your 2L year with 60 credits and only 30 could transfer, that would be an enormous waste of loan money and time. 

haus

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2011, 08:33:40 PM »
From the Michigan Law school page for transfer students.

"In general, transfer applicants must present one full year of academic credit and may expect a maximum of one year of transfer credit to be accepted toward the Michigan degree. At least two years of credit must be earned in residence at the University of Michigan."

http://www.law.umich.edu/prospectivestudents/admissions/Pages/TransferStudents.aspx

It seems that you would need to spend two years as a student there if you hope to earn a degree.

While Chicago states things differently, it seems that any transfer that they accept will only be granted one years worth of credit.

http://www.law.uchicago.edu/prospectives/transfer

scoop333

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2011, 10:26:14 PM »
Whatever school you attend for two years is where you will get your law degree from (it is an ABA rule).  If you are already a 2L that transferred into your current school and you want to go to another school you will have to forfeit a year of school.

FalconJimmy

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2011, 12:00:23 PM »
I am at BC top 15% 2L with a summer job. I originally transferred from a T2 top 10%. I really want to teach in the future and I want to go to Michigan or Chicago.

Can it be done?

This is going to sound blunt, but looking over the faculty of my school, if you're a white male, you can only teach if you went to Harvard or Yale.  Women and URMs, all bets are off.

This should probably shape your decision if you're a white male.  Basically:  going to Chicago or Michigan probably still won't be enough to get you a teaching post.

If you're a woman or URM, then BC might be enough.

outofthewest

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Re: Transferring after your 2nd YR of LS
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2011, 08:54:18 AM »
Can't be done, but you can be a visiting student your third year, wherein you take classes at a different school but receive your degree from your original school. A lot of people do this just to have access to networking opportunities in that final year if they're absolutely committed to a particular region.

As others have said, academia is hard to swing no matter where you go, but if you really want to shoot for it, your best bet might be to graduate from BC and apply to LLM positions at elite schools. Nearly all of my professors have LLMs in addition to having gone to Yale/Harvard/Chicago/etc.