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Author Topic: All Online Law School Students  (Read 3595 times)

passaroa25

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All Online Law School Students
« on: May 14, 2011, 08:04:03 AM »
Do those of you who are currently enrolled in any online law school want to get involved in discussing court opinions, on this forum, so that we can practice thinking like attorneys?
Angie

john4040

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2011, 09:19:28 AM »
Do those of you who are currently enrolled in any online law school want to get involved in discussing court opinions, on this forum, so that we can practice thinking like attorneys?

lol.....

passaroa25

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2011, 05:13:55 PM »
I guess the answer is "No."  Oh well.
Angie

john4040

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2011, 10:46:38 PM »
I guess the answer is "No."  Oh well.

Let's start out with Pennoyer v. Neff.... you can go first.

passaroa25

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2011, 01:34:22 AM »
Okay.  Let me read it again.  I'll brief it and post what I think the court is saying within 24 hours. 
Angie

john4040

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2011, 01:49:39 PM »
Okay.  Let me read it again.  I'll brief it and post what I think the court is saying within 24 hours.

No using Google or any other outside source.  You must rely only on your own reading comprehension abilities and analytical skills.  Afterall, you're being trained to think like a lawyer here....

FalconJimmy

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2011, 02:10:33 PM »
Okay.  Let me read it again.  I'll brief it and post what I think the court is saying within 24 hours.

Wow, dude, stop!

He's messing with you. 

Penoyer v. Neff is a case that is so commonly cited in 1L classes that you should be able to cite the relevance to Civil Procedure off the top of your head.

It is pretty much like the equivalent of Newton's first law of motion in an introductory class on physics.

What he's basically saying, and what you appear to be proving, is that online law school is a ridiculous waste of time and money.

john4040

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2011, 02:38:47 PM »
Okay.  Let me read it again.  I'll brief it and post what I think the court is saying within 24 hours.

Wow, dude, stop!

He's messing with you. 

 ;D    I'm just training him to think like a lawyer.


Attended California Southern for a year in the 80s, currently attending Mid-Atlantic School of Law, studying for NALA’s Certified Legal Assistant Exam, just completed an online paralegal program.  What an odd path.

Edit:  I see now why he would be unfamiliar with Pennoyer v. Neff.  His school uses Gilbert Law Summaries for textbooks...
http://www.midatlanticlaw.org/Page2.html

passaroa25

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2011, 03:06:09 AM »
No body of law is as simple as you think it is, FalconJimmy.   It seems as though you didn't read haven't reviewed Pennoyer v. Neff recently either.  If you did, you would know that one of the  things the court said was that the land Neff wanted back could not be sold to satisfy a previous default judgment.   It also discussed in personam jurisdiction vs. jurisdiction in rem.   I didn't see anything in Pennoyer v. Neff about all the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.  How, can it be the foundation of civil procedure without the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure?  And, if you paid attention to my autobiography, you would remember that I was a 1L at the Mercer School of Law in the 80s.  California Southern was in 2008.  My odd path is because I'm depending on my own lack of money. 

And, before you write Mid-Atlantic off, I challenge you to read all the cases cited  in just chapter one of the Gilberts' Outline, alone, (we read all the cases in each volume) and tell me you still remember what the court said in Pennoyer before you express such dismay at my having to review it.  You obviously have not attended any online law school.  Otherwise, you wouldn't make such presumptive statements.  Any school, online or otherwise, it what the student makes of it.  The student does the reading and the learning by his or her efforts alone.  Online and correspondence law schools are not a waste of time.  The concept has been  proven worthy in Great Britain for the last hundred years.

And, you John, should pay more attention to detail as well.  If you read what I said, I indicated that I would have to read Pennoyer again.  And, did you also know that being deceptive is not encouraged in the field of law?  You acted as though you were interested in a sincere discussion and later, admitted to wanting to teach me a thing or two about "thinking like a lawyer."   I think that one of the reasons why attorneys have such a bad reputation is because some of them really think like you do: saying one thing and thinking something entirely different.

By the way, dudes, I am not a dude.  Don't make assumptions.
Angie

FalconJimmy

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Re: All Online Law School Students
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2011, 06:39:48 AM »
No body of law is as simple as you think it is, FalconJimmy.   

Dude, person, chicka, whoever you are, you were being mocked.  I was trying to help you. 

I absolutely do not have much of a grasp of any body of law.  That's not a fact I attempt to conceal.  Nor do I think I could write a doctoral dissertation on Newton's first law of mechanics, but I do know that if I walked into a room and said, "hey, let's talk about physics" and somebody said, "Okay, you start:  tell us what you know about Newton's first law", I'd know I was being made sport of.

If it's important to you, wow, you got a biggo brain and your school is the best school in the state. 

And perhaps apropos of nothing:  you clearly have dug into Penoyer v. Neff, but as a law student, the point to emphasize is the one you briefly touched on in terms of personal jurisdiction.  You might get a bonus point for the other items you mentioned, but personal jurisdiction is the point to focus on for your civ pro class, which is where Penoyer is going to be taught. 

I have no reason to doubt that you're an intelligent, articulate person.  I can only hope that your online education is sufficient to bring out the potential of your personal abilities.

Best of luck with your studies and career.