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Author Topic: When to Apply  (Read 429 times)

staciii

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When to Apply
« on: April 13, 2011, 02:01:51 PM »
I'm beginning to become overwhelmed once again with the though of applying. I'm nervous that I don't have the GPA to get in, Seattle U being my school of choice. With my GPA being at either a 3.0 or just shy of that when I will apply in Oct, I am realt relying on doing well on the LSAT, and we all know you can't just assume. That being said, how well does taking a year off and working add to your application? Ive heard that time between your graduation and application makes somewhat of a difference, so do you think that year would really help?

FalconJimmy

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Re: When to Apply
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2011, 11:14:56 PM »
I don't think taking a year between undergrad and law school will make any difference, whatsoever, in your application.

T3 school. 

25%-75%  GPA 3.17–3.60,  LSAT 154-160

Seems to me so long as you get something in the high 150s or better, you stand a good shot at getting in.

Regardless of what anybody says, the bulk of the admissions decision is just based on LSAT, GPA and in some cases, the color of your skin.

Any other factor just doesn't matter much and in most cases, doesn't matter one iota.

MikePing

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Re: When to Apply
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2011, 11:12:53 AM »
Taking a year off doesn't--by itself--make your application stronger or weaker.  But, if you need the time to study harder for the LSAT, or get your life in order, it certainly can make a difference.

Starlett

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Re: When to Apply
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 12:14:56 AM »

I agree with MikePing’s answer above.  I also don’t think taking a year off is going to necessarily improve your application.  If you think you can get your GPA up or do better on your LSAT, then I think taking the year off may be worth it.  Also, applying early is always advantageous.  Most schools have rolling admissions and perhaps waiting a year will allow you to apply very early in the admissions cycle with higher numbers.  Good luck.

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