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Author Topic: How does this sound?  (Read 529 times)

jmorr9000

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How does this sound?
« on: April 12, 2011, 01:52:40 AM »
I'm a current undergrad sophomore, rising Junior, and just today I jumped into LSAT prep for the first time. I figured the best way to start was to take the free practice test from LSAC, and time myself like I was taking the actual test. My score, with no previous preparation, was a 159. From what I've read that sounds like a pretty decent place to be in right off the bat. My GPA is sitting a little low for my tastes, at a 3.2, but that's after 4 credits of French to fulfill my language requirement that didn't go so well, and I anticipate mostly smooth sailing (depending on how Stats goes next year) from here on out. Based on my performance in all my major related classes so far (Political Science), which have been almost all As with a few Bs, I think it's realistic to expect I'll get something between a 3.3-3.5 by the time I graduate.

I can't really afford the super expensive LSAT prep courses, so my plan is basically to get my hands on as many real practice tests as I possibly can and start doing those over the summer with the goal of taking it spring of my junior year. Do I sound like I'm on a solid track? And is there any other practice advice you guys have? I'd like to try and get that 159 up to a high 160 somethin' or I mean, maybe even something round 170 (a boy can dream).

I have no illusions about getting into a T-14 or anything, but would a top 50ish school be a reasonable goal with a 3.3-3.5 GPA and a 160-170 LSAT score?

In general just wanted to say Hi and ask for any advice you guys might have. Thanks!

MikePing

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Re: How does this sound?
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2011, 12:20:02 PM »
Top 50 sounds like it is within your reach; though, you should try to be a bit more proactive about where you want to go to law school.  Depending on where you want to live/practice law, there are good schools and not so good schools.  You might want to check on that.  Then you could have an absolute target for your LSAT. 

As far as prep, it depends on what schools end up on your list.  If you skip the prep course (which is a good investment), in addition to the practice tests, plan on buying these three books at an absolute minimum:

Powerscore Logic Games Bible
Powerscore Logical Reasoning Bible
Powerscore Reading Comprehension Bible 

Good luck, and let us know what you decide!

FalconJimmy

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Re: How does this sound?
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2011, 04:30:24 PM »
If you can't afford a prep class, I would, at a minimum, get the Powerscore Logic Games Bible. 

Best of luck.

Jeffort

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Re: How does this sound?
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2011, 09:21:13 PM »
I'm a current undergrad sophomore, rising Junior, and just today I jumped into LSAT prep for the first time. I figured the best way to start was to take the free practice test from LSAC, and time myself like I was taking the actual test. My score, with no previous preparation, was a 159. From what I've read that sounds like a pretty decent place to be in right off the bat. My GPA is sitting a little low for my tastes, at a 3.2, but that's after 4 credits of French to fulfill my language requirement that didn't go so well, and I anticipate mostly smooth sailing (depending on how Stats goes next year) from here on out. Based on my performance in all my major related classes so far (Political Science), which have been almost all As with a few Bs, I think it's realistic to expect I'll get something between a 3.3-3.5 by the time I graduate.

I can't really afford the super expensive LSAT prep courses, so my plan is basically to get my hands on as many real practice tests as I possibly can and start doing those over the summer with the goal of taking it spring of my junior year. Do I sound like I'm on a solid track? And is there any other practice advice you guys have? I'd like to try and get that 159 up to a high 160 somethin' or I mean, maybe even something round 170 (a boy can dream).

I have no illusions about getting into a T-14 or anything, but would a top 50ish school be a reasonable goal with a 3.3-3.5 GPA and a 160-170 LSAT score?

In general just wanted to say Hi and ask for any advice you guys might have. Thanks!

You are in a good situation to be able significantly enhance your potential law school prospects when you get to the applying stage since you have plenty of time ahead of you to lock in good numbers (UGPA and LSAT score). 

Starting with a cold 159 is great news in terms of your potential final score on test day.  Given your starting point and the time you have, with good QUALITY prep you should be able to reach/break 170. 

If you can reach at least mid-high 160's as well as pull your GPA up to ~3.5 range, you should have no problem getting accepted to several LS's ranked in the top 50 and could even get yourself accepted to some first tier schools if you knock the LSAT out of the park.

I started with a cold first time practice test score of 151 and ~6 months later hit 177 on the real thing, applied with my crappy UGPA (low 3.XX region, I spent more time on girls and parties 1st two years of UG than on classes and studying but 'reformed' myself and my GPA later) and was accepted to several tier 1 LS's with scholarship $$$ offers from some.  Ended up attending and graduating from USC (go Trojans!) law school.

Main point being, you have a lot of potential to be able to secure admission to a highly ranked LS if you prioritize well and play your cards right.

That being said, DO NOT go with doing the "churn and burn" prep method of mainly just doing a bunch of timed tests.  That routine alone does not help you figure out/train you how to perform better.  By itself it mainly just helps you get better at answering the same amount of questions wrong in less time.

Since you are a sophomore with plenty of time ahead before you need to take the LSAT, right now you should be focusing most of your academic/study time on your UG classes in order to increase your UGPA.  You get do-overs with the LSAT since most LS's take your highest score.  You do not get do-overs with your UGPA.


jmorr9000

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Re: How does this sound?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2011, 11:57:28 PM »
Thanks guys, this makes me a little more optimistic. I'll let you know what I end up doing.