Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Poll

Where Should I go???

University of Oregon
 1 (25%)
University of Denver
 3 (75%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Author Topic: University of Denver v. University of Oregon  (Read 5052 times)

bigs5068

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1474
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: University of Denver v. University of Oregon
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2011, 04:30:06 PM »
Fair enough, but in the end just like every profession whether it be Attorney, Doctors, VP of marketing, etc all will generally not say I am so overpaid, getting my job was so easy, and the hours I put in are so manageable. Generally they  will say I am not getting enough money, my education was to expensive, the hours I work are to long. On top of that many will not end up in the law firm, hospital, company, they really wanted to work for when they first went to X Law School, X Med School, X MBA program.

They all work out for most people. However, I don't think any profession is as glamorous as an incoming student makes it out to be. Again that is only my two cents and I could be completely wrong.

FalconJimmy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: University of Denver v. University of Oregon
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2011, 04:59:15 PM »
They all work out for most people. However, I don't think any profession is as glamorous as an incoming student makes it out to be. Again that is only my two cents and I could be completely wrong.

I think you're right about that.  At best, most people can get a summary level introduction to a profession, but won't know the details of the grind until they have to do it day-in, day-out.

jack24

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1050
    • View Profile
Re: University of Denver v. University of Oregon
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2011, 10:47:21 AM »
They all work out for most people. However, I don't think any profession is as glamorous as an incoming student makes it out to be. Again that is only my two cents and I could be completely wrong.

I think you're right about that.  At best, most people can get a summary level introduction to a profession, but won't know the details of the grind until they have to do it day-in, day-out.

I also think it is important to note that the profession varies greatly by office.  I work for an office where I am basically my own boss.  I have a caseload and as long as people are happy my bosses are happy.  It's perfect for me.  I have friends in similar offices in the area where they are constantly micromanaged and they feel their job is a restrictive grind.   We basically took offers for the same jobs and our lives are completely different.

The beauty of the legal field is that there are hundreds of different career paths you can take.  The problem of the new economy is that the freedom to move around has been greatly reduced by high debt and a lack of opportunity.  There was an opening for a prosecutor position at a metropolitan DA's office and over 200 attorneys (post graduates) applied.  That position paid between 50,000 and 60,000. 

This type of information isn't intended to dissuade you from going to law school at all.  I'm not saying you can't get a job if you get out there and look.  I am suggesting that graduates over the next couple of years will have very little freedom to choose what type of job they want, so they may have a ton of debt, very little income, and a job they did not want in the first place.