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Author Topic: University of London-L.L.B. External Program- 2Yr Program or 3Yr Program  (Read 8847 times)

Titanium20

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California will allow a graduate from a foreign law school if:

A general applicant who has a first degree in law from a law school located in
a foreign state or country must:

(A) Obtain from a credential evaluation service approved by the
Committee a certificate that the applicant’s first degree in law is
substantially equivalent to a Juris Doctor degree awarded by a law
school approved by the American Bar Association or accredited by the
Committee; or

(B) Obtain from a credential evaluation service approved by the
Committee a certificate that the applicant’s first degree in law meets
the educational requirements for admission to practice law in the
foreign state or country in which it was obtained.

AND

(Roughly) an LLM from an ABA school.

My question is this. Does anyone know someone that obtained their LLB from the University of London External 2Yr Graduate Program + ABA LLM and was allowed to sit for the CalBar?

passaroa25

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The University of London program should work for you.   While doing extensive research on alternative law school programs, I did come across several law school correspondence courses with several schools in Great Britain.  The only reason why I did not pursue the foreign degrees track is because I am very partial to American law and because I simply could not afford the programs out of Great Britain.  I say, Great Britain, instead of England, because I believe Scotland has an external law degree program as well.    The state of New York allows holders of foreign law school LLB's to sit for their bar exam as well.  From the quote you provided, it looks like all you need to do is provide the California Board of Examiners with your transcripts and a complete description of each course you have taken.   Also, you will have a choice of ABA accredited LLM programs to choose from once you have completed the British law school program.
Angie

financialandtaxguy

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Be careful with the LLB program from U of L.  I attended there for one year in their advanced placement program.  Although it is very thorough, they expect you to memorize too much case law.  The exams are only once a year.   So your future in law is determined by one exam per course at the end of the year and if you fail the exams as I did, you have to spend another whole year studying again, and then risking your future on one final exam one year later!  I wrote and told them that their program is not very realistic of real life practice of law, where a lawyer has much more time to examine and prepare for a case, and not assessing a student throughout the year with other graded assignments is a little ridiculous.  Our law exams are a little better in that you are not required to know case law, but unrealistic in the method of exam. 

Another reason I would not attend U of L again, is because as  a freedom loving American, I would not want to attend a Law School that also teaches Sharia Law.  The price for attending U of L is very reasonable, about $3000.00+/- per year, but the price you pay in other ways, is not worth it in my opinion.

passaroa25

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You touched on a bit of reality that I have discovered in many online law schools:  you have to memorize a lot of concepts and rules of law in a relatively short period of time.  The program you described at the University of London is similar to online law schools here.  The student is expected to know all the black letter law for criminal law, torts, and contracts and is expected to be able to apply the black letter law to hypothetical situations almost flawlessly after studying for just one year.  Then your future depends on the first year law students' exam.  That kind of program would work perfectly if the person studying online did not have to work or take care of a family.   It really takes two years to memorize all you need to know for the FYLSE.
Angie

financialandtaxguy

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You touched on a bit of reality that I have discovered in many online law schools:  you have to memorize a lot of concepts and rules of law in a relatively short period of time.  The program you described at the University of London is similar to online law schools here.  The student is expected to know all the black letter law for criminal law, torts, and contracts and is expected to be able to apply the black letter law to hypothetical situations almost flawlessly after studying for just one year.  Then your future depends on the first year law students' exam.  That kind of program would work perfectly if the person studying online did not have to work or take care of a family.   It really takes two years to memorize all you need to know for the FYLSE.

I share your sentiments, as I am 51 years old, a Registered Investment Adviser and Tax Accountant here in CA, and find that I'm up against old tradition or weeding out process that the American bar system has.  If you read my other posts, you will see that when I seek out lawyers for work with my clients, such as Estate Planning, I interview them first, because I don't care where they went to law school or if they passed the bar, but they have to prove to me competency and good moral character.  All I want to do is use the Attorney License for Estate Planning work which I have done, Contract Law because of my business background, and Tax Law because of my tax accounting experience.  So these unrealistic hurdles such as the Baby Bar and Bar don't impress me as being indicators that a lawyer will be of sound and ethical legal practice.

What I said about the University of London or what I meant by stating that you have to know case law, is that the U of L exams expect you to quote the citation for all your reasoning or application of the rule of law.  I got the feeling at times, that one of the professors was very much into her knowledge of citations, and then it became very overwhelming to me.  If anyone chooses U of L, make sure you only have a part-time job and can memorize case law citations otherwise you will be drowning in school work.  I know the U of L is accredited in England, and can be an open door for you to sit for the bar in other states and not just CA, but you have to know what State you want to practice law and if they will recognize the LLB from U of L.  I would still suggest a California online or distance learning law program if you are an American, work full-time, don't mind being limited possibly to CA and Federal Courts, and appreciate our constitution and legal system.

I chose Northwestern California University School of Law (now disenrolled) because of content and price, and I liked that I could get lectures and definitions on MP3 and listen to them anytime.  Currently, I am studying for my second attempt at the Baby Bar this October.

gul

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Hi....I am from India and will start my full time LLB hons from Indian University only. I want to do Distance learning LLB hons from UOL in 2 years. Does anyone know which country's bar exam I can appear for apart from India. If I do LLM from ABA distance learning only, will I be able to appear for Baby bar exams. Can anyone help me with these questions or any additional information or suggestions

cusc2011

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I did the distance learning LLB at a law school located in the UK and I'm now in a LLM program at an ABA law school. I would speak with the Bar Examiners in California they are straight forward on giving you the info. Everything they told me was legit during my journey.  I did the 3 yr route because I didn't want to chance it, in case I had opportunities in the future to get liscensed in other jurisdictions.  Some states just say an accredited first degree and some states like California will require an evaluation.  I'm not sure if the 2 yr would work, so you need to contact the bar examiners.  I had my LLB degree evaluated by an approved agency by the California Bar Examiners and my degree assessment was equivalent to a US JD at an accredited university.

vanceap3

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cusc:  I went ahead and applied to NU for LLB but was wondering a few things.  You have helped me a great deal already so hate to keep asking...however, it is difficult to get good info out of the school.
1.  For the books, did you just use the "essential" reading books?  If not, did you purchase them all?  My circumstances are probably different, on a fixed income.
2.  Regarding the end of year tests, the other guy on this forum indicated that U. of London's exams had questions that required one to know citations, etc.  Are NU's test similar?  Do they have both essay (IRAC) questions and Objective type questions?
3.  I am currently waiting for information from the U regarding venue for my exams...I had asked them for the closest places but apparently they are very busy right now (I guess grading, etc.)...they said they will let me know by June (which kind of erks me).
4.  These last two questions (3 and 4) are not really questions...I don't have anything against learning about sharia law...just because you learn about something, does not necessarily mean that you agree with concepts.

cusc2011

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Vanceap3 -  I purchased all the required books but used it mainly in a supplemental capacity. NU provides you many resources to succeed, PowerPoint, Online lectures and you can download lecture to iPod which is great to listen while working out, etc. Professors respond promptly to any question, you can schedule a phone call or skype meetings as well.  You also have access to their library database, WesLaw, and Lexus Nexus.  Each class provides a workbook, which basically is another law book, I made sure I knew it from cover to cover.  In terms of books, if you search online like Amazon, you should be able to get used books and stay within 200 -250 per year for books.  Keep in mind you have 8 months to prepare for 1 exam, so realistically you don't have to get the books right away, because you can focus on the workbook and online lectures.  Most of the required books are written by the professor of the class.  Exams are essays and multiple choice. I used the IRAC method in answering the questions, although they called it something else but it was the same concept. You will have plenty of opportunities to submit practice essays for the Professor to critique.

As far as sharia law, NU taught common law principles only.  Good luck to you!