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Author Topic: MPRE  (Read 1338 times)

aglittman

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MPRE
« on: March 01, 2011, 06:37:41 PM »
Hi everyone,

I'm taking the MPRE on Saturday.  How many hours do you think I need to study?  The state where I'm taking the bar requires an 85.   Thanks

jack24

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Re: MPRE
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2011, 10:56:26 AM »
I had the barbri book and the "Supreme Bar Review MPRE Review" book.   I read through the outlines once and then did all of the practice tests.  I think it probably took me between 10 and 20 hours total.  I wasn't happy with my scores on the practice tests, and I felt like crap after I took the test.  I got a 107.

(To give you a gauge of my abilities, I got between a 158 and 162 on the LSAT)

john4040

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Re: MPRE
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2011, 11:52:03 AM »
Studied 2 days prior to the test, took no practice tests, and got a 118.  It's a joke.

MikePing

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Re: MPRE
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2011, 12:07:14 PM »
Just have a general familiarity with the test and types of questions.  I assume you have taken Professional Responsibility?  If so, just review your outline and maybe a commercial MPRE outline. 

aglittman

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Re: MPRE
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2011, 04:15:45 PM »
Thanks everyone!

BikePilot

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Re: MPRE
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2011, 09:35:07 AM »
I studied a free barbri/kaplan (don't remember which one it was) handout for half a day, got a 140 I think it was. Like everyone said, the test is a joke and as best I can tell serves no purpose but to extract a few bucks from you and waste our time - it certainly isn't rigorous enough to verify that you know anything.

HLS 2010