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Author Topic: Average amount of time off in between undergrad and ls?..  (Read 535 times)

ar918

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Average amount of time off in between undergrad and ls?..
« on: February 21, 2011, 05:28:48 PM »
Thoughts?

I'm happily riding through 3rd year, onto the 4th, of full time paralegal work. My LOR's are almost 4 years old. Say I have same GPA/LSAT as a senior undergrad. Yes, my resume is thicker, I've gained a network of some in the Phila legal community, and I've written briefs and legal documents for the past three years, not some flimsy Philosophy paper last month, but am I at a disadvantage compared to these seniors since I've been out of school for so long, or is it all based on numbers? Thanks.

NonTradInSATX

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Re: Average amount of time off in between undergrad and ls?..
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2011, 06:52:11 PM »
Couldnt say on average time between, but I would think you'd actually be at an advantage.  Not only do you have your numbers, but you have w/e in the legal field and at least some understanding of how law works.  You aren't 10+ years out of undergrad, you've just had some solid work experience in the field and are moving forward with your education.  Write a great PS and call it a day.
Military Officer separating, 1L fall 2011

San Antonio, TX

MikePing

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Re: Average amount of time off in between undergrad and ls?..
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2011, 03:05:17 PM »
Your numbers are going to dictate which pile of applications that law school puts you in:  Presumptive Admit, Presumptive Deny, or Further Review. 

If you are in the Presumptive Admit, the seat is yours to lose by having some major flaw in your application. 
If you are in the Presumptive Deny group, there isn't much that can save you.

Being in the Further Review pile, your application will get a great deal of scrutiny.  I would do a personal statement that highlights something you have learned after undergrad.  Don't repeat the info in your resume.  Take the professors who wrote those old LOR's out to lunch and catch up.  Ask them if they could write an updated version.  I would use at least 2 professor LOR's and then have one of the attorneys you work with (particularly ones from the school you are applying to) write you 1 LOR.  I don't think the time off between undergrad will be too much of a problem unless your undergraduate performance was shaky.  If your GPA isn't that great, make sure to address that issue--subtly--in your personal statement. 

If you want some more specific advice, message me.  Good luck!!