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Author Topic: Starting Cooley in May  (Read 6905 times)

buehford

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Re: Starting Cooley in May
« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2011, 03:31:53 PM »
Do yourself a favor and read: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/business/09law.html

Cooley is a mill. It is truly helping to ruin our profession. It advertises as though law school is some type of trade school and, as far as Cooley goes, it is. Everybody gets in; no standards at all. Frankly, most people attending Cooley couldn't get into a reputable law school. Moreover, for those who do graduate, they leave with a mountain of debt and a degree from a disreputable school. They in turn drive down rates for other attorneys as they will work for peanuts so they can service their debt load. If you have an option to go to any other school, avoid Cooley. If you are offered a large scholarship based on your LSAT and ug GPA, then you can probably get into a real school. If Cooley is your only option, you probably shouldn't be in law school.

politicolaw

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Re: Starting Cooley in May
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2011, 11:20:30 PM »
Do yourself a favor and read: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/business/09law.html

Cooley is a mill. It is truly helping to ruin our profession.
It does happen to be the largest law school. No, legal zoom is helping to ruin our profession.

It advertises as though law school is some type of trade school and, as far as Cooley goes, it is. Everybody gets in; no standards at all. Frankly, most people attending Cooley couldn't get into a reputable law school.
Everyone does not get in, about a third do not get in. To attend full time an applicant would have to have a 149- about an average LSAT score. Part time generally requires at least a 145. The past few years have been some of the most competitive years in law school admission.

Moreover, for those who do graduate, they leave with a mountain of debt and a degree from a disreputable school.
The school has maintained ABA accreditation for decades and still currently does. A large percentage of students receive scholarships and/or work and attend part time. Over 70% of Cooley students attend part time indicating that they work to offset the cost to minimize debt after graduation.

They in turn drive down rates for other attorneys as they will work for peanuts so they can service their debt load.
Sounds personal to me, maybe you should have gone to a more affordable law school. More than likely, the economy has driven this concern and not one particular law school.

 If you have an option to go to any other school, avoid Cooley. If you are offered a large scholarship based on your LSAT and ug GPA, then you can probably get into a real school. If Cooley is your only option, you probably shouldn't be in law school.
overly exaggerated, stereotypical opinion. I bet you would only recommend going to law school if an applicant can attend a top tier school or at least an instate law school- thus telling the majority of law students that they should not attend law school.





Thanks for telling us the repeated Cooley stereotype on the Cooley Law board.

Cooley Law has maintained its ABA accreditation for decades, and continues to do so. Additionally, the standards for admission are increasingly rising. To be admitted full time an applicant would have to have at least a 149. A 149 is in the median of LSAT test takers- gone are the days of low 140s acceptances. Today's Cooley students are generally average or better test-takers, and most are working professionals making their way through law school part time **while also gaining experience.

Cooley is a tier 4 level school, and the people that attend accept that and work to make the most of it. Compare Cooley to Detroit Mercy or Dayton or any other private, 3rd or 4th tier Midwestern law school and you will see both benefits and disadvantages to Cooley.

If you go to an ABA law school congratulations on your accomplishments, to get to that point it requires great preparation and dedication- and more so to finish. Going to a "lower tiered" school does not mean that you should not go to law school, it only means that you have specific circumstances, a scholarship, or geographical preferences.

lawstudent#1

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Re: Starting Cooley in May
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2011, 06:22:27 PM »
Geographic Preference be damned, they are setting one up on every street corner like a 7-11 chain.

Now if the 4 Michigan campus options didn't suit you, go to Florida.

http://www.cooley.edu/newsevents/2011/080811_cooley_opens_tampa_campus.html

Next, the moon (first law school in space!)